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Latino Daily News

Tuesday October 25, 2011

Tariffs on U.S. Goods Lifted as First Mexican Truck Allowed into U.S. Under New Trade Agreement

Tariffs on U.S. Goods Lifted as First Mexican Truck Allowed into U.S. Under New Trade Agreement

Photo: Tariffs on U.S. Goods Lifted as First Mexican Truck Allowed into U.S. Under New Trade Agreement

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In 2009, the United States refused to allow anymore Mexican trucks across the border to make deliveries deep into the U.S., but Presidents Obama and Calderon came to an agreement in April that would comply with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) obligations, and once again allow Mexican trucks into the U.S.

In response, Mexico implemented tariffs on American goods, which ranged from 5 to 25 percent on American products crossing the border.

Friday, Mexico suspended those tariffs on just hours before the first truck from Mexico was scheduled to cross into the U.S.

When the tariffs were implemented, it cost the U.S. 25,000 jobs due to the decrease in goods to Mexico.

The new agreement allows the U.S. to strictly monitor Mexican trucks, ensuring they stay on the approved routes.

Still, some lawmakers and teamsters say the new agreement is a bad idea, claiming the program will affect highway safety and put American jobs at risk.

Just before the first Freightliner truck, being driven by Josue Cruz, from Mexico crossed into the U.S., the owner of the Transportes Olympic trucking company, Fernando Paez, told those at a gathering of the send off, “We have to be extra orderly and very respectful. We will demonstrate that we can operate safely and efficiently.”

Among the many U.S. goods that had tariffs imposed on them were Christmas trees, onions, oranges, deodorant, and sunglasses. In total, about $2 billion worth of tariffs had been in place.