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Latino Daily News

Friday August 12, 2011

Hispanics Drinking More Bottled Water than Any Other Demographic, Marketers Taking Notice

Hispanics Drinking More Bottled Water than Any Other Demographic, Marketers Taking Notice

Photo: Hispanics Drinking More Bottled Water than Any Other Demographic, Marketers Taking Notice

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According to a study by the Archives of Pediatric Adolescent Medicine minorities are drinking more bottled water than anyone else, because they find it safer and more convenient. And it seems marketers have taken advantage of that belief and begun gearing their bottled water towards Hispanic consumers.

Taking notice of the tendency of Hispanics to reach for bottled water, business owners like Paul Kurkulis founder and president of Las Oleadas, a mineral-enhanced water, are pumping into the bottled water game.

The Colorado-based company first marketed itself directly to Hispanics with its name, Las Oleadas, which is loosely translated from Spanish to mean “the momentum that drives a wave.” Originally, the bottle’s labels were only in Spanish, but English is now printed on them as well.

In the past two years, brands like Coca Cola and Nestle have launched campaigns geared towards minorities. In the summer and fall of 2010, Nestle came out with its “Better Habits for a Better Life” campaign for its Pure Life bottled water. The campaign was aimed at Hispanics, using a commercials with a Latina mother talking to another mother about benefits of water and even included a “challenge” so to speak.

At the center of Nestle’s campaign was “La Promesa Nestle Pure Life,” in which mothers were challenged to substitute one sugary drink a day with a bottle of water, their Pure Life of course. Once the mothers made the pledge, they were entered to win more than $20,000 in prizes.

Making campaigns like this successful in the fact that Hispanics are under the impression that bottled water is healthier and safer. However, in 2008, the Environmental Working Group tested the quality of 10 major bottled water brands. The study revealed bottled water had the same chemical contaminants found in tap water, showing that bottled water is no safer than water from the faucet.

What Hispanics and the majority of others do not realize is that 47.8 percent of the water in bottled water comes from municipal taps, then same place household water that flows into their homes.

So though bottled water has been proven to be no more ‘healthy’ than tap water, marketers continue to push how much better and cleaner their bottled tap water is, with Hispanics seemingly falling for it hook, line, and sinker.

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