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SaturdayDecember 10, 2011

Latino Daily News: Bringing You the Latest Hispanic Current Events and News Stories 24/7

To reflect the dynamic interests of our audience, Latino Daily News is an online daily news source and virtual cultural center for and about Latinos. We offer the latest news headlines, as well as innovative and insightful Hispanic current events stories, photos, videos, and commentaries from a Latino perspective, 24/7.

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New Pitbull And Chris Brown~ International Love (VIDEO)

New Pitbull And Chris Brown~ International Love (VIDEO)

Photo: Pitbull and Chris Brown

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Check out the just-released music video for International Love, the new single from Pitbull, featuring Chris Brown, off of the rapper’s album Planet Pit!


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First Woman Accepted Into Mexican Navy’s Special Forces

First Woman Accepted Into Mexican Navy’s Special Forces

Photo: Mexican Navy Special Services

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Mexico’s navy has accepted the first woman into the ranks of its special forces, an elite group dedicated to intelligence operations, the fight against criminal cells and anti-terrorism, among other missions, officials said.

“It bears mentioning that, in an unprecedented occurrence, the first woman has graduated from the Mexican navy’s special forces course,” the Navy Secretariat said Friday in a statement, without offering more details.

It added that 12 men also successfully completed the training, “which consists of five phases: induction, parachuting, commando and stress, mountaineering and intervention.”

In 2008, the Mexican armed forces began allowing women to enter areas of the military previously set aside for men, including combat engineering units and the air force.

Tens of thousands of military personnnel and federal police have been deployed to areas plagued by cartel turf battles since President Felipe Calderon took office in December 2006, a period of time in which nearly 50,000 people have died in drug-related violence.

The navy’s special forces have participated in numerous operations against drug-trafficking and organized crime gangs.

In 2009, they took part in an operation in the central city of Cuernavaca in which powerful drug kingpin Arturo Beltran Leyva was killed in a shootout.

The navy’s special forces personnel receive training in urban and jungle combat in extreme climate conditions, anti-terrorist missions, parachuting, camouflage and concealment and weapons-handling, among other tasks, and also are given additional instruction in the United States, Colombia, Israel and France.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Watch Anderson Cooper & Joel Aguilar, 16 yo Extreme Couponer (Funny AND Educational Video)

Watch Anderson Cooper & Joel Aguilar, 16 yo Extreme Couponer (Funny AND Educational Video)

Photo: Joel Aguilar from TLC Extreme couponing

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Meet Joel, a 16-year-old coupon addict who once called couponing a hobby but now admits it’s an obsession.

 


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Smoking Statistics in the Hispanic Population

Smoking Statistics in the Hispanic Population

Photo: Hispanic Smoking Statistics

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Smoking causes more preventable deaths (from lung cancer, heart and lung disease, other cancers, and chronic illness) than any other single behavioral factor––an estimated 443,000 deaths each year in the United States. The most recent data estimates that about 8,400 Hispanic-Americans were expected to be diagnosed with lung cancer in 2009, with the vast majority of these cases caused by smoking.

Lung cancer can be treated, but rarely cured. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in Hispanic men and––after breast cancer––the second-leading cause of cancer death in Hispanic women. Hispanics are less likely to develop or die from lung cancer than non-Hispanic whites—but when they are diagnosed they are more likely to be diagnosed with a more serious advanced stage disease.

In 2010, almost 13 percent of Hispanics were current cigarette smokers, compared to 21 percent of non-Hispanic whites. Men are more likely to smoke (almost 16 percent) than women (9 percent). Smoking rates are higher among Hispanic high school students (18 percent) than Hispanic adults—a worrisome finding for future lung cancer trends in Hispanics.

Immigrant generation may affect cigarette smoking––nearly 17 percent of Hispanics who were born in the United States smoke, whereas only about 11 percent of Hispanic immigrants are smokers. Other patterns of smoking show that Hispanic subgroups have different smoking rates.

Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body and diminishes a person’s overall health. Millions of Americans have health problems caused by smoking, a leading cause of cancer and death from cancer. Smoking causes many types of cancer, including cancer of the lung, esophagus, larynx, mouth, throat, kidney, bladder, pancreas, stomach, and cervix, as well as acute myeloid leukemia. Smoking also causes heart disease, stroke, aortic aneurysm (a balloon-like bulge in an artery in the chest), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, hip fractures, and cataracts.

Trying To Quit

Regardless of their age, people who quit smoking are less likely to die from illnesses caused by smoking than those who continue smoking. Studies show that smokers who quit at about age 30 reduce their chance of dying prematurely from smoking-caused diseases by more than 90 percent. The risk of dying is cut in half for those who stop smoking at age 50, and even people who quit at about age 60 or older live longer and have healthier lives than those who continue to smoke.

The nicotine in tobacco is addictive and makes it very difficult to quit. Nicotine dependence is the most common form of addiction in the country. Seventy percent of the 45 million current U.S. smokers report they want to quit completely, and the vast majority of these have tried to quit smoking at least once. The majority of Hispanic smokers want to quit smoking and almost 10 percent of Hispanic smokers report quitting smoking in the past year.

Smoking Quitline

Talk with an NCI smoking cessation counselor for help quitting and to get answers to smoking-related questions in English or Spanish. Call 1-877-44U-QUIT (1-877-448-7848) toll free within the United States, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Many resources are also available on NCI’s web site, smokefree.gov.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Mexico raises Minimum Wage by 4 percent- Mexico City Goes to $4.58 a Day

Mexico raises Minimum Wage by 4 percent- Mexico City Goes to $4.58 a Day

Photo: Oaxacan Family

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Mexico’s National Commission on Minimum Wages, or CNSM, has approved an average minimum wage hike of 4.2 percent, or about 2.51 pesos ($0.18) per day, a measure that will go into effect starting Jan. 1.

For Zone A, which includes the Mexican capital and its surrounding area, the minimum wage will be 62.33 pesos ($4.58) per day.

In Zone B, covering the cities of Guadalajara and Monterrey, it will be 60.57 pesos ($4.45) a day.

And in Zone C, where the lowest wages are paid in such states as Aguascalientes, Chiapas and Guanajuato, the minimum wage is set at 59.08 pesos ($4.34) a day.

CNSM is an organization in which the government, business associations and the main labor unions are represented, and has become a place for reaching agreements on miminum wage increases.

The demand of organized labor was for a 10 percent wage increase and the elimination of one of the three geographic areas.

The 4.2 percent minimum wage hike was described by the Center for Labor Research and Union Consulting, or CILAS, as just one more joke at the expense of millions of Mexican men and women.

“This increase, insufficient as usual, the only thing it does is guarantee an increase in the number of poor people,” the organization said.

According to official figures, between July and September there were 2.8 million jobless people, plus 4.2 million who were underemployed and another 13.4 million working in the informal economy.

Of the 113 million Mexicans, according to the latest census, some 52 million are living in poverty.

Read more by HS News Staff →

The Santiago Bernabéu: Mythical Venue (VIDEO)

The Santiago Bernabéu: Mythical Venue (VIDEO)

Photo: Santiago Bernabeu

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Since the first league meeting in 1929, Real Madrid have played host to Fútbol Club Barcelona on 81 occasions, of which the home team have emerged victorious 50 times, 15 Clasicos have ended level while the Catalans have won the remaining 16 clashes.


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Business, Love and Survival: Four of L.A.’s Entrepreneurial Latino Families Share their Stories

Business, Love and Survival: Four of L.A.’s Entrepreneurial Latino Families Share their Stories

Photo: Portos Bakery and Cafe

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It’s not often that people get choked up during a business panel, but it happened this week when KPCC’s Crawford Family Forum presented a panel on Latino family businesses.

The panelists were members of the families behind some of Los Angeles’ most recognizable Latino-owned businesses: Tapatio hot sauce, Porto’s Bakery & Cafe, the Guelaguetza Oaxacan restaurants and Gaviña Gourmet Coffee, all into their second generation and beyond of family ownership.

What made the conversation, which I moderated, surprisingly moving was how the panelists delved not only into their families’ entrepreneurial history and success, but the ties that bind them together. At least for these families, the ties were strong enough to draw the second generation back to work with their parents, even after obtaining degrees in business, medicine and law.

All of the panelists, children of these companies’ immigrant founders (some of whom were in the audience) attributed their parents’ creativity and entrepreneurial spirit to a basic drive for survival, using whatever skills they had to provide for their families.

Perhaps Betty Porto, who remembers her Cuban immigrant mother baking cakes at home to sell as a way of putting food on the table, both in Cuba when times got tough and as a new arrival in Los Angeles, put it best:

“I think the first generation brings the work ethic,” Porto said. “When you are a first-generation immigrant, there is no going back. What you bring is the work ethic and the hunger. The second generation brings the education and the sophistication and the way of using the American system of doing business, which is the greatest system in the world, in my opinion. I think that is their biggest contribution. But the work ethic, and this desperation to work and make something of themselves in a foreign land, that’s something only the first generation has.”

A few other highlights from the panelists’ anecdotes:

Read more by HS News Staff →

Shakira Debuts New Haircut at Spanish Awards Gala

Shakira Debuts New Haircut at Spanish Awards Gala

Photo: Shakira new haircut

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Shakira was impressive Friday with her glittery sequined dress and new haircut at the Gala of Los 40 Principales Prizes, on the eve of the big soccer match between her boyfriend’s Barcelona squad and Real Madrid.

Asked by reporters to predict the outcome of the match, she responded “I’m not the octopus,” an allusion to the famous octopus in Germany that “foretold” the results of the 2010 World Cup.

The Colombian is one of the artists with the most nominations at the Gala being held at the Palace of Sports in Madrid and organized by Los 40 Principales, Spain’s leading music radio network.

“I’m so happy to be here now, this is Spain’s night, the night of a country I like so much, and I’m really happy to be at the gala of prizes so important for music,” the artist told Efe.

“I hope they give me some good news tonight so I can celebrate tomorrow,” she said.

A celebration that, she said, she’ll spend with boyfriend Gerard Pique, who will be at Santiago Bernabeu Stadium on Saturday for the big Real Madrid-Barcelona soccer match.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Alabama Gov. Willing to Revise Controversial Immigration Law

Alabama Gov. Willing  to Revise Controversial Immigration Law

Photo: Alabama Immigration Law

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Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said Friday that he and his legislative allies are ready to consider changes to the state’s harsh imigration law, but will not alter the essence of the measure.

“The leadership of the Alabama House and Senate and I are working together to develop a bill for consideration at the beginning of the next legislative session. The bill’s purpose is to clarify and simplify the current immigration law,” the Republican governor said in a statement.

Bentley said he wants to see an enforceable law that “reflects the hospitable nature of Alabamians.”

HB 56, which criminalizes the presence of undocumented immigrants in Alabama, has provoked multiple lawsuits by the Justice Department and various organizations and is already having a negative impact on the state’s economy.

The governor said Alabama enacted the measure because the federal government failed in its responsibility to enforce U.S. immigration laws.

“We recognize that changes are needed to ensure that Alabama has not only the nation’s most effective law, but one that is fair and just, promotes economic growth, preserves jobs for those in Alabama legally, and can be enforced effectively and without prejudice,” Bentley said.

The speaker of the lower house of the Alabama legislature, Republican Mike Hubbard, emphasized that the body “isn’t going to repeal or weaken this law.”

The announcement from the governor and legislative leaders comes amid mounting evidence of the confusion HB 56 is causing, as citizens and legal permanent residents find themselves being detained on suspicion they are in the country illegally.

Thousands of immigrants have fled the state, leaving many Alabama businesses without customers or employees, especially in the agriculture and service sectors.

Aware of the negative attention generated by HB 56, Gov. Bentley said he was “reaching out internationally to reassure our global partners that the business climate in Alabama is as strong as ever, and our people and communities are as inviting and welcoming as we’ve always been.”

Read more by HS News Staff →

Paraguay to Hand Over Indigenous Land

Paraguay to Hand Over Indigenous Land

Photo: Enxet child in the Chaco region of northern Paraguay.

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The Paraguayan government has this week signed an agreement with Enxet Indians to hand back 1,000 hectares of their ancestral land.

The decision comes after a long legal battle between the indigenous people and state before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACHR).

The Enxet community of Kelyenmagategma in northern Paraguay has been fighting for its land for over a decade and has been subjected to a barrage of forced evictions, intimidation and violent threats.

After the case was brought before the IACHR the Enxet received 8,748 hectares of their ancestral land in August this year.

Under this week’s agreement the government should provide the community with new homes, health posts, schools and up to $500,000 for community projects.

Enxet leader Celso Benítez Zavala has welcomed the decision but warned he would remain vigilant to ensure the government keeps its promises, after ‘years of the state’s profound disinterest’.

Read more at Survival International →

Kids Write Letters to Obama Begging Him Not to Deport Parents

Kids Write Letters to Obama Begging Him Not to Deport Parents

Photo: Children of Deportation

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Dozens of U.S.-born children of undocumented immigrants are meeting at a Methodist church in Chicago to pray to Our Lady of Guadalupe and write letters they will send to President Barack Obama asking him not to deport their parents.

“President, I beg you not to deport my parents this Christmas,” wrote Jesus Arriaga in one of the first of their letters to be delivered to the White House before Christmas.

Beside him on Thursday night was undocumented mother Guadalupe Lopez, who has lived in the United States for 14 years and who described her drama in another letter saying that immigration authorities want to separate her from her U.S.-born children.

“I’m in the deportation process and at a minimum - if I have to leave the country - I won’t be able to come back for 10 years,” she said.

The prayers and letters are part of a nationwide campaign entitled “Don’t Take Away Our Parents,” which in Chicago is led by the Familia Latina Unida/Centro Sin Fronteras organization that fights the separation of families through deportations.

The organization has invited youngsters whose parents face a deportation order to meet at Lincoln United Methodist Church for Thursday and Friday night Novenas to Our Lady of Guadalupe.

“We want Obama to treat the community well and take measures to keep the Department of Homeland Security from dragging its feet and delaying the application of his policy of discretion in dealing with cases that involve people being sent away,” Emma Lozano, president of Familia/Centro, said.

She recalled that in August, after a year of campaigning by activists on behalf of U.S.-born children and their families, Homeland Security announced a new policy to put deporting actual criminals ahead of expelling people accused only of immigration offenses.

“The DHS promised to review 300,000 existing deportation orders and rule on them individually, but the bureaucracy drags its feet and the separation of families continues,” Lozano said.

Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.), who headed a nationwide campaign to pressure the government into revising its deportation policies, has organized informative workshops in Chicago and prepared lists with names of people who could benefit from the new policy, as a way of helping the government follow up on those cases.

Nonetheless, he acknowledged this week that the implementation of the new guidelines has been delayed and their application has been erratic.

Centro Sin Fronteras, the organization that sheltered Mexican activist Elvira Arellano in a Chicago church for a year, demanded in a communique an end to deportations of those who have put down roots in this country.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Rebel Landmines Kill Colombian Soldiers

Rebel Landmines Kill Colombian Soldiers

Photo: Rebel Landmines Kill Colombian Soldiers

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Two Colombian soldiers were killed and four others were injured by landmines planted by leftist FARC guerrillas in the northeastern province of Norte de Santander, the military said Friday.

The incident occurred Thursday in a mountainous area outside the town of Teorama while members of the army’s 30th Brigade were patrolling the zone.

A spokesperson at brigade headquarters in Cucuta, the provincial capital, told reporters the mines killed two soldiers and injured four others.

The injured were taken to Ocaña, a city in that same region, and are being treated at its municipal hospital, according to the spokesperson, who said the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, the Andean nation’s largest guerrilla army, planted the explosive devices.

The International Campaign to Ban Landmines said in its latest annual report that Colombia has the world’s second-highest rate of landmine-related casualties after Afghanistan.

Landmines killed and injured 1,211 people in Afghanistan and 512 people in Colombia last year, the ICBL said.

The FARC has fought a decades-old struggle against a succession of Colombian governments.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Majority of Latino Voters Say Religion has No Impact on Voting Preferences

Majority of Latino Voters Say Religion has No Impact on Voting Preferences

Photo: Hispanic vote 2012

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impreMedia, the leading Hispanic news and information company, announced today the results of a national tracking poll focused on religion and social values.

The survey was conducted by impreMedia and Latino Decisions between November and early December. The poll revealed that a majority of Latino voters, 53%, stated that religion does not have an impact on their voting preference, while 40% of respondents indicated that it does have an impact. However, when voters are broken down among parties, religion plays a much larger role for Latino Republicans, with 47% indicating that religion does make an impact on their electoral decisions.

When asked if the candidate’s religion had an impact on their vote, 55% of respondents said that it had no impact at all; compared to 43% who believed it does have an impact.
The results further indicate that social and moral values are not top priorities among Latino voters.

Read more by HS News Staff →

LOOSEN UP this weekend with a Latin American Natural Wonder

LOOSEN UP this weekend with a Latin American natural wonder.  Guess What and Where this is?

 

latin

 

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22 States Count Mexico as Their No. 1 or No. 2 Export Market- New Report Released

22 States Count Mexico as Their No. 1 or No. 2 Export Market- New Report Released

Photo: Mexico is one of US Largest Export Markets

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Friday the New Policy Institute’s 21st Century Border Initiative released a major new report researched by The North American Center For Transborder Studies (NACTS) at Arizona State University, “Realizing the Value of our Cross Border Trade with Mexico.”

NDN/NPI President Simon Rosenberg released the following statement on the release of the report: “This compelling new report underscores what a vital economic partner Mexico has become for the people of the United States.  We hope this work, and the work of our 21st Century Border Project, will help lead to a greater appreciation in the minds of many, of just how important the bi-lateral relationship is for the US today.  That we trade more Mexico than we do with the UK, Germany and Japan combined, and almost as much as we do with China, will certainly be eye-opening to many.”

The full report can be read here.


Among the key statistics presented in the report:

Mexico has become the U.S.’s third-ranked commercial partner and the second most important market for U.S. exports; Mexico spent $163 billion on U.S. goods in 2010.

U.S. sales to Mexico are larger than all U.S. exports to the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) combined, as well as all combined sales to Great Britain, France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

Twenty-two states count Mexico as their No. 1 or No. 2 export market: Mexico is the largest export market to the two largest economies in the country in Texas and California.

Other states that count Mexico as their largest export market are Arizona, New Mexico, and New Hampshire.  It is the second largest export market for states such as Colorado, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee.

Read more by HS News Staff →



SaturdayDecember 10, 2011