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WednesdayApril 27, 2011

Latino Daily News: Bringing You the Latest Hispanic Current Events and News Stories 24/7

To reflect the dynamic interests of our audience, Latino Daily News is an online daily news source and virtual cultural center for and about Latinos. We offer the latest news headlines, as well as innovative and insightful Hispanic current events stories, photos, videos, and commentaries from a Latino perspective, 24/7.

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Opportunity for Latinos Wanting to Write for Major Television Networks

Opportunity for Latinos Wanting to Write for Major Television Networks

Photo: Latinos in Television

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The National Latino Media Council (NLMC) Television Writers Program submission period is now open for those writers who can write at least one half-hour comedy or one-hour dramatic television script in English within a five-week period of time. The program will take place in Burbank, CA from October 8th to November 11th.

Each participant is expected to complete at least one script by the end of the five-week session, which will then be read by network executives. Those writers whose scripts show promise will be interviewed and mentored by the network executives with the idea of placing them on a show. A stipend of $250 per week will be given to each participant. Flight, housing, and meals will be provided.

The NLMC Television Writers Program is an intensive scriptwriters workshop to prepare and place Latinos in writing jobs for the major television networks. This project is modeled after the previously successful Hispanic Film Project. The television scriptwriters workshop is designed to familiarize participants with the format, characters and storyline structure of specific shows that are currently on the air. This five-week, total immersion workshop is mentored and guided by former NBC V.P of Script Development, Geoff Harris.

The workshop is conducted in Burbank, CA and a total of 10 writers are recruited nationwide from established network of NHMC chapters, other non-profit agencies, schools, universities, guilds and media organizations. The goal is that the writers garner the skills necessary to obtain employment in the industry. The NLMC Writers Program was created in accordance to part of NHMC’s mission to improve the image of American Latinos as portrayed by the media and increase the number of American Latinos employed in all facets of the media industry.

The program directly responds to the lack of diverse writers in primetime network TV with the idea that if there are more diverse writers present at the writer’s table, more diversity will be reflected on TV.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Honduras to Spend $37 Million to Improve Basic Education

Honduras to Spend $37 Million to Improve Basic Education

Photo: Honduras Primary Education

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Honduras will improve basic education for more than 100,000 students with the help of a $37 million loan from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The financing will help students to learn more in basic education schools that serve the country’s poorest population.

The program’s goal of improving educational quality is designed to complement the “Bono 10Mil” program, which provides conditional cash transfers to low-income families that keep their children in school.

The IDB funding will support high quality programs in early childhood development that will close the gap between what children know and what they are capable of learning, prior to entering primary school. In addition, some 100,000 students will benefit from activities to strengthen instruction in math and Spanish with new textbooks and educational materials for students and teachers. Training for teachers will include the use of computers for instructional activities.

These actions will help to reduce the first grade repetition rate, presently at 20 percent, to less than 12 percent in three years.

More than 50,000 students in grades three to six will receive a personal computer to improve their learning and encourage them to graduate from elementary school. In Honduras, the graduation rate of sixth grade students is less than 70 percent. It is expected that this rate will increase by one point for each year of the program to produce a graduation rate of 75 percent.

The 545 beneficiary schools will receive technical equipment for network connections to digital educational resources, computer applications for collaborative work in school (“groupware”), and administrative management support. Teachers in these schools will also receive a computer and technical support.

Studies have suggested that using personal computers in school increase expectations and commitment to education for students and families. These results have been seen in countries such as Uruguay, Peru, Paraguay, and Colombia.

Read more by HS News Staff →

FTC Sends Out $1.5 Million in Refund Checks to Hispanics for Discrimination of Mortgage Lender

FTC Sends Out $1.5 Million in Refund Checks to Hispanics for Discrimination of Mortgage Lender

Photo: The FTC sends out $1.5 million in refund checks to Hispanic consumers who were discriminated against when trying to obtain mortgages

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The Federal Trade Commission has mailed refund checks to Hispanic borrowers allegedly charged more on their mortgage than their white counterparts. The refunds total $1.5 million.

The 3,100 refund checks are a result of a lawsuit filed by the FTC against Golden Empire Mortgage, a California-based company, and its CEO Howard Kootsra. The lawsuit points out that while the Hispanic borrowers were charged more, no records could explain why, as neither the consumers’ credit or underwriting showed risk.

In September, Golden Empire struck a settlement, and a $5.5 million judgment was suspended when the lenders paid the $1.5 million for the refunds. The settlement expressly forbids Golden from discriminating on the basis of national origin in future loans and requires that they “establish a policy restricting the discretion of a loan originator’s pricing.” The defendants are also required to make sure the data and training programs for its employees are completed.

Those receiving the refund checks are urged to cash them before June 21.

Read more at Housing Wire →

Deportation of DREAMers Being Suspended

Deportation of DREAMers Being Suspended

Photo: DREAMer Olga Zanella on the dat of her high school graduation

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Two years ago, Olga Zanella, 20, began her battle with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), but the Mexican-born college student has lived under the possibility of deportation since she was a child.

Like so many before her, and since, when she was five-years-old, Olga’s parents brought her to the United States. Things were difficult, but it wasn’t until February of 2009 when things got worse. Olga was pulled over by local police in her hometown of Irving, Texas, and the officer discovered that she did not have a driver’s license. Authorities never gave a reason for the stop, and have not issued any kind of ticket. Police would go on to hand her over to immigration officials, and for the last two years, she has been fighting against the agency that has tried so hard to remove her from the country.

Her case was not going well until just a few days ago, when everything changed.

On April 14th, Olga and her family were summoned by Dallas ICE officials. In a surprising turnaround, ICE informed the Olga that she would be allowed to remain in the country, under ICE supervision, as long as she stayed in school and out of trouble. They made no promises to her family, however.

Monday, the Zanellas presented papers to the agency, officially turning themselves in and requesting some kind of legal immigration status.

“It’s an opportunity we are going to take,” Olga Zanella told the New York Times. “It’s better than being in the shadows.”

Cases like the Zanellas’ are prime examples of the actions being taken by Democratic legislators and immigration advocates demanding that the current administration slow down deportations of undocumented immigrants who have not been convicted of crimes. Pressure has been especially applied to stop the deportations of those eligible for legal status under the DREAM Act – a proposal which has yet to pass.

Senate Democrats Harry Reid of Nevada and Richard Durbin of Illinois asked President Obama to suspend the deportation of the DREAM Act-eligible students in a letter sent on April 13th.

The deportation of another student, Mariano Cardosa, 23, was suspended as well. The suspension ended the Connecticut student’s two-year battle with ICE.

Immigration lawyers like Gregory Chen, the director of advocacy for the American Immigration Lawyers Association, say that nationally, the deportation policy remains confusing and poorly implemented.

“The administration needs to make it clear to the public and to the rank and file within ICE that it has a firm and clear policy of enforcing the law within its priorities and discouraging going after cases that are not within its priorities,” said Chen. “But that is just not happening consistently.”

Read more at New York Times →

Mexicans Protest Via Twitter with #FailedState &  #EstadoFallido Hashtags

Mexicans Protest Via Twitter with #FailedState &  #EstadoFallido Hashtags

Photo: #estadofallido

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In response to the violence ravaging the Mexican nation on a daily basis, citizens from south of the border have started to tweet their commentaries, protests, and news, followed by the #estadofallido hashtag, sending a direct message to the government of president Felipe Calderón: Is Our Mexican State Failing?




Recently, an anonymous Mexican blogger has published a blog (www.estadofallido.mx) called Failed State, Chronicle of the National Security Crisis, helping the trend gain momentum.

Certain circles however, don’t feel the sense of failed state present all over twitter and the afore mentioned blog is true.  GlobalVoicesOnline.org, an international community of bloggers who report on blogs and citizen media from around the world published the following in response to #estadofallido:

“In this country, 36 million students go to school every day, on time. The country functions. We have strong, separate, independent powers: the Executive, the Legislative, the Judicial. In this country we have regular elections. They are won and lost; they are hotly debated, and the press is not muzzled. There is absolute freedom to publish, to present ideas in an atmosphere of freedom that is without precedent in Mexico.[…]  The reality is that Mexico is very, very far from being a failed state”

It may be true, but when the daily news being exported from Mexico spell little other than corruption, drug trafficking, kidnapping, gruesome murder, 14 year olds carrying AK-47 assault rifles, etc. and when the US advices against visiting south of the border, is hard not to feel like the Mexican state is indeed failing.

What do you think? We value your opinions.

Read more by HS News Staff →

UFC Latino Launched on Monday, Will Have Both English and Spanish Content

UFC Latino Launched on Monday, Will Have Both English and Spanish Content

Photo: UFC Latino launched on Monday

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Thanks to tremendous growth in its Hispanic fan base in the United States, the Ultimate Fighting Championship® announced Monday that it will launch a website dedicated to bilingual UFC® fans.

UFCLatino.com, launched Monday, will serve bilingual UFC® fans by providing unique content in both Spanish and English. The site will cater to the culture of the blossoming audience of Hispanic fans who are drawn to the UFC’s fast-paced, exciting action. What’s more, the site will include news, video and special content featuring charismatic Hispanic stars such as UFC heavyweight champion Cain Velasquez, bantamweight champion Dominick Cruz, top welterweight Diego Sanchez, and Octagon® girl Arianny Celeste.

“The UFC has become a really popular sport with Hispanic fans based in the U.S.,” UFC President Dana White said. “We’ve seen the fan base grow and grow, so we’re excited to launch UFCLatino.com as a way to continue to serve Hispanic fans. We’re fortunate to have great Hispanic champions such as Cain Velasquez and Dominick Cruz and we want our fans to have access and feel connected to our athletes.”

“I am extremely proud of my Hispanic heritage and honored to have such great support from the Hispanic fans,” Velasquez said. UFCLatino.com is such a great way for Hispanic fans in the U.S. to keep up with UFC news and enjoy content in both Spanish and English. I’m excited that I’ll have the opportunity to be featured at UFCLatino.com and encourage Hispanic fans to visit the site.”

UFCEspanol.com will remain intact, offered in Spanish only, and available in Latin America.

For more information, or current UFC fight news, visit UFC.com.

Read more at UFC Latino →

State Owned Uruguayan TV Channel Has Been Operating for 12 Years Without Broadcasting Anything

State Owned Uruguayan TV Channel Has Been Operating for 12 Years Without Broadcasting Anything

Photo: Uruguay's Canal 8, 12 years not Broadcasting Anything

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State owned Melo’s Channel 8 has studios, antennas, cameras, 7 workers and its own building, but hasn’t broadcast a single image in over a decade.

Every day, at 6 in the morning, the 7 workers of Channel 8 in Melo (some 240 miles of Montevideo, Uruguay), arrive at work to make sure the equipment is clean and in working conditions, for the day when somebody orders the reactivation of the channel’s operations, shut down since 1999.

“ 12 years ago, broadcasting was shutdown and ever since then the channel simply bridges the signal from Montevideo” said Pedro Saravia, national deputy for the area.

Saravia also said he found strange that neither the Ministry of Education nor the Ministry of Culture ever explained why this happened, or responded to the people’s petition to have the channel back on the air.

In its heyday, Channel 8 exported their signal to as far as Brazil, and even owned a mobile satellite unit, which hasn’t been used since the last time it was sent to cover the news in Montevideo.

Furthermore, all their equipment was replaced for brand new, state of the art equipment, only a few years before they closed down; since the channel is state owned, all that practically new equipment can’t be sold or rented, and is becoming outdated without even being used.

 

 

Read more by HS News Staff →

About.com Launches Spanish-Language LGBT Website

About.com Launches Spanish-Language LGBT Website

Photo: About.com launches Spanish-language LGBT website, Comunidad Gay

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About.com has launched a new Spanish-language site for the gay community.

The following was released by the site:

About.com launches Spanish-language topic-site for the gay community

As part of About.com expansion into the U.S. Hispanic market, the company launched Monday a topic-site for the gay community – Comunidad Gay—that aims to help users solve the large and small needs of everyday life.

Comunidad Gay is part of a recently launched channel, About.com en Español, currently featuring topics such as movies, music, kids, dogs, Internet for beginners, personal computers, literature, makeup and spreadsheets, with nearly 100 more expected by the end 2011.

“About.com’s more than 14 years of experience helping users accomplish their goals has taught us that when a user comes to you from search with a need, the most satisfying, trustworthy way to answer is with information from highly accomplished experts, capable of addressing the user’s need from all angles,” said Cella Irvine, president and CEO, About Group.

Comunidad Gay will be guided by Daniel Shoer-Roth, who works for El Nuevo Herald and has received two national awards from the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD).

Read more at Comunidad Gay →

Goverment Officials Returning Seized pre-Columbian Artifacts to Panama

Goverment Officials Returning Seized pre-Columbian Artifacts to Panama

Photo: Pre-Columbian artifacts

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Today at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) headquarters, ICE Director John Morton and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Assistant Commissioner Thomas S. Winkowski repatriated 99 pre-Columbian artifacts seized as a result of operations by ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and CBP in Los Angeles and Portland, Ore., to Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli.

“Sadly, the theft and trafficking of cultural artifacts is one of the oldest forms of organized cross-border crime,” said ICE Director Morton. “While seizing, forfeiting and repatriating cultural artifacts like these is indeed reason for celebration, our long-term goal is to reduce the incentive for further destruction of ancient tombs and temples, where so many of these objects are dug up or chiseled off and pilfered.”

“The joint efforts to identify and return such important Panamanian artifacts exemplify the outstanding level of cooperation and partnership between the Panama and the United States to fight different types of international crime and specifically to protect our historical patrimony and culture,” said President Martinelli. “We remain committed to working closely with the United States to any necessary undertake measures to preserve our cultural heritage, and it is my sincere hope that efforts such as these will lead to the end the trafficking of illegal antiquities around the world.”

These items, previously imported into the United States, were discovered as part of an investigation that began in 1998, under the U.S. Customs Service, an ICE legacy agency. The ICE attaché office in Panama received a tip from Panamanian investigators that a Panama Canal Commission employee was smuggling pre-Columbian artifacts out of Panama into the United States. Panamanian authorities advised that the individual exported four large shipping containers, manifested as household goods, to Oregon – containers that they believed contained pre-Columbian artifacts. A search of the containers revealed six Panamanian pre-Columbian artifacts, among other items. The artifacts were seized and returned to Panama.

Later that year, Panamanian investigators executed a search warrant at the employee’s residence in Panama, during which 148 pre-Columbian artifacts were recovered. The employee was indicted in 2003 in Oregon for smuggling and conspiracy to transport, receive, possess, conceal and store stolen property. The individual pleaded guilty to smuggling and was sentenced to probation.

Two other individuals were also identified as part of the employee’s conspiracy. ICE HSI agents intercepted shipments of pre-Columbian artifacts destined for the United States addressed to one of those individuals, a professor at a U.S. university. Both individuals were indicted for conspiracy to transport, receive, possess, conceal and store stolen property though the charges were ultimately dismissed. The professor agreed to turn over 99 Panamanian pre-Columbian artifacts that he illegally imported into the United States from Panama as part of the plea agreement. In 2005, ICE HSI agents in Los Angeles and Portland supervised the authentication, inventory and seizure of the 99 artifacts.

Valued at approximately $100,000, these artifacts represent a very complete sample of most of the pottery styles in pre-Columbian Panama from the period A.D. 1 through 1500. These are unique artifacts, made entirely by hand by Native American Indian potters, without use of a throwing wheel or mass production techniques. During this period in Panama, potters were considered specialists in their craft and presumably at the service of chiefs.

The confiscated materials were likely looted from graves in south-western Veraguas around the shores of the Gulf of Montijo. The repatriated items include three-legged grinding tables known as “metates” used for grinding maize kernels, pottery vessels and figurines, and pedestal plates.

 

Read more by HS News Staff →

Inmate “Fights” to Stay in Jail for Fear of Being Killed by Los Zetas

Inmate “Fights” to Stay in Jail for Fear of Being Killed by Los Zetas

Photo: Alexandro Guerrero attacks jail guard to stay in jail

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A prisoner Arizona, who was about to be released, attacked a guard in an attempt to stay incarcerated, because he feared being killed my cartel hit men.

Alexandro Guerrero, 26, has spent the last few years trying to remain in jail because he fears hit men from the Mexican drug cartel Los Zetas will try to kill him, because they believe he has divulged information to the law enforcement.

Guerrero was scheduled to be released last week from a Pinal county jail after serving time for a failure-to-comply warrant out of Yuma, Arizona. Not wanting to be released however, Guerrero punched a detention officer in the face and attacked him when he fell to the ground. (See ABC video below) This is not the first time the inmate’s actions have resulted in an extended sentence. According to the Department of Corrections in order to remain in jail Guerrero has lit his cell on fire, crafted a weapon, refused to sign release forms, and thrown hot water at an officer’s face.

Read more at Phoenix New Times →

Judge Reduces $15,000 Fine To $1,000 For Manhattan Teacher Who Said Coñ* In Class

Judge Reduces $15,000 Fine To $1,000 For Manhattan Teacher Who Said Coñ* In Class

Photo: Carlos García

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ImageSupreme Court Justice Barbara Jaffe considered the fine “disproportionate.”

Carlos Garcia, who teaches history, was suspended and given the $15,000 fine after students complained he repeatedly used the word “Coñ*” in class, mostly, when students were disrupting the lesson.

García denies having used the word as an insult, and alleges that the misunderstanding stemmed from that particular word’s multiple meanings.

Take a word like “ass,” or an expression like “You are an ass.” Things like intent, context, intonation and the body language that accompanies the sentence, allow for a vast range of interpretations and meanings, some funny, some insulting, some having to do with donkeys.

Evidently, whoever fined Garcia 15k, has never been to Spain, Cuba or the Dominican Republic, where coñ* sprouts up every other sentence, even in a particularly passionate Sunday sermon.

“There’s such a divergent definition of it in the culture here, even among Hispanics, so the context makes all the difference,” Said Sergio Villaverde, Garcia’s lawyer. “They (school system officials) were swatting flies with a sledgehammer.”

The judge said, in reducing the fine to $1,000, she didn’t think García intended “cause fear or physical or mental distress or belittle or subject the students to ridicule,” by using the word.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Director-Choreographer Jamie King Joins Jlo and Marc Anthony’s New Show

Director-Choreographer  Jamie King Joins Jlo and Marc Anthony’s New Show

Photo: Jlo, Marc Anthony, Jamie King and Simon Fuller

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New details have surfaced on the new talent show venture of Jlo and Marc Anthony, now called “Q’Viva” a show “for the 21st century.”

“This is not about competition, it’s about finding great talent, cultivating that talent and sharing it with the world, ” said Jamie King, the most recent addition to J-lo’s Q’Viva.

Marc Anthony and J-lo will take a three month long trip through central and South America, in a “journey to create the ultimate live show celebrating Latin music, artistry and dance.”

Jlo said “This is a show for the 21st century with an unprecedented global and local story. The Latin culture is a tapestry that is rich in passion, tradition and artistry. We are going to places where all of this talent lives and wouldn’t have otherwise been discovered. This journey for me and Marc is going be exciting and groundbreaking.”

Executive Producer Simon Fuller said the upcoming show “truly celebrates the beauty and splendor of Latin music and dance.” Adds King: “This is not about competition, it’s about finding great talent, cultivating that talent and sharing it with the world.”

Read more by HS News Staff →

Fiat Investing $100 Million in Argentina

Fiat Investing $100 Million in Argentina

Photo: Fiat in Argentina

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Fiat Industrial is set to invest $100 million in Argentina that will result in 600 new jobs and 1,500 indirect jobs.

The $100 million will go toward building a new manufacturing plant which will manufacture combines and specialty tractors for the Latin American market and expanding an existing plant in Cordoba, Argentina.

The announcement was made by Fiat Industrial Chairman Sergio Marchionne and Argentina’s President Cristina Fernandez. 

The initial investment will expand manufacturing capabilities in Cordoba by adding new localized product lines that are expected to be ready in the fourth quarter of this year. 

Read more at Reuters →

White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics

White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics

Photo: White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics

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Hispanic success in education and in the labor market is of immediate and long‐term importance to America’s economy, according to a new report released today by the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics and the U.S. Department of Education. The report shows that Hispanics have the lowest education attainment level overall of any group in the U.S.

Hispanics are by far the largest minority group in today’s American public education system, numbering more than 12.4 million in the country’s elementary, middle and high schools. Nearly 22 percent, or slightly more than 1 in 5, of all pre‐K-12 students enrolled in America’s public schools is Hispanic, but they face persistent obstacles to educational attainment. Less than half are enrolled in any early learning program. Only about half earn their high school diploma on time; those who do complete high school are only half as likely as their peers to be prepared for college and only 4 percent have completed graduate or professional degree programs.

Senior Obama Administration officials met with dozens of educators and community leaders at Miami Dade College today to release the report and to outline strategies to meet President Obama’s goal for the nation to have the best-educated workforce in the world by 2020.

White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics director Juan Sepúlveda said Latino education attainment is important in the global contest for jobs and industries.

“Hispanic students have graduated at lower rates than the rest of the population for years, making America’s progress impossible if they continue to lag behind,” said Sepúlveda. “Strengthening and improving educational excellence in this community isn’t just a Hispanic problem. It’s a challenge to the entire country.”

The nation’s Hispanic population increased by 15.2 million in the last decade, accounting for more than half of the nation’s total population growth. The report shows that Hispanics will drive the growth of the labor force over the next several decades, accounting for 60 percent of the nation’s growth between 2005 and 2050.

Read more by HS News Staff →

CENSUS: Only 14% of Latinos Have College Degree, Lowest Level Amongst All Minorities

CENSUS: Only 14% of Latinos Have College Degree, Lowest Level Amongst All Minorities

Photo: Hispanics with College Degrees

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According to the Census in 2010, 36 percent of the nation’s population 25 and older left school before obtaining a degree. This includes 15 percent of the population that didn’t earn a regular high school diploma — a group sometimes labeled “dropouts.” Among this group were about 1 percent of the population who reached the 12th grade, 2 percent who reached the 11th grade but still did not graduate, and 2 percent who earned a GED.

An even greater share of the 25-and-older population — 17 percent — attended some college but left before receiving a degree. At the graduate school level, 4 percent of the population left before obtaining an advanced degree.

Data also include levels of education cross-referenced by a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, including age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, household relationship, citizenship, nativity and year of entry.

Other highlights:

*  More than half (52 percent) of Asians 25 and older had a bachelor’s degree or more, higher than the level for non-Hispanic whites (33 percent), blacks (20 percent) and Hispanics (14 percent).

*  Women 25 and older were more likely than men 25 and older to have completed at least high school, at 87.6 percent versus 86.6 percent.

Thirty percent of foreign-born residents of the U.S. had less than a high school diploma, compared with 10 percent of native-born residents. Nineteen percent of naturalized citizens had less than a high school diploma. At the same time, 29 percent of the foreign-born population had a bachelor’s or higher degree, compared with 30 percent of the native-born population. (The percentage of native-born residents with at least a bachelor’s degree was not statistically different from the percent of foreign-born residents with less than a high school diploma.) Thirty-five percent of naturalized citizens had a bachelor’s or higher degree.

Read more at Census →

Conn. Governor Supports Keeping College Student in US and Homeland Security Reverses Decision

Conn. Governor Supports Keeping College Student in US and Homeland Security Reverses Decision

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A Connecticut College Student fighting deportation has received word that the US dept of Homeland Security has reversed their decision to demand that he leave the country in 60 days.

When Mariano Cardoso was 22 months old, his family entered the country illegally from Mexico and settled in New Britain, Connecticut. The federal department has issued a temporary stay of removal, according to a news release from Sen. Richard Blumenthal.

“This decision is right for Mariano – and right for America – in light of his roots in the community and his future contributions to our society,” Blumenthal said. “I am thrilled with the Department of Homeland Security’s decision to grant Mariano Cardoso a stay of removal, renewable each year, so that he can remain in the only country he has ever known.

Gov. Daniel P. Malloy recently joined the fight for Cardoso to stay in the U.S. and asking federal immigration authorities to halt deporting the New Britain man.

“Mariano is a promising young man with a bright future, and DHS’ swift action on this issue ensures that he will be able to continue contributing to his community,” Blumenthal said.

Read more at CBS News York →

U.S. Border Patrol Arrests Illegal Aliens, Thwarts Human Smuggling Attempt

U.S. Border Patrol Arrests Illegal Aliens, Thwarts Human Smuggling Attempt

Photo: Entering U.S.via Water Illegally

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A collaborative effort between Customs and Border Protection Office of Air and Marine and the U.S. Border Patrol prevented a maritime human smuggling attempt yesterday that resulted in the arrest of seven Mexican nationals.

At approximately 5:30 p.m., CBP Air and Marine assets observed a suspicious 22-foot 1975 Chrysler boat travelling north near San Diego Bay. CBP Air and Marine followed the boat and contacted Border Patrol agents who responded to the area.

The boat docked at the Grape Street Pier and Border Patrol agents on shore performed an immigration inspection of the seven individuals that disembarked the vessel. The three females and four males were determined to be Mexican nationals who had entered the United States illegally by sea. Border Patrol agents took them into custody and transported them to a local Border Patrol station for processing and further investigation.

The seven Mexican nationals are being held in DHS custody pending further investigation. The vessel was seized by CBP Office of Air and Marine.

Customs and Border Protection is a member agency of the Maritime Unified Command. The MUC is comprised of the U.S. Coast Guard, CBP Office of Air and Marine, CBP Office of Field Operations, CBP U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, as well as state and local law enforcement partners operating in the San Diego and Orange County maritime domain. The MUC utilizes the fusion of intelligence, planning and operations to target the threat of transnational crime along the coastal border.

Read more by HS News Staff →



WednesdayApril 27, 2011