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Tag Results for "Inah"

2,000 Year Old Jaguar Statue Uncovered in Southern Mexico

Mexican archaeologists discovered a nearly 2,000-year-old sculpture of a jaguar in the Izapa archaeological zone, the National Anthropology and History Institute, or INAH, said in a communique. continue reading »

Archaeologists Discover 850 Year Old Human Remains in Central Mexico

Mexican specialists found 15 graves with entire human skeletons estimated at more than 850 years old at an archaeological site in the central state of Queretaro, the National Anthropology and History Institute, or INAH, said. continue reading »

Take a Virtual Tour of Archaeological Sites via Google Mexico’s Street View

Cybernauts will be able to take virtual strolls through 30 Mexican archaeological sites using Google Mexico's Street View platform, Mexican cultural authorities said. continue reading »

Mexican Archaeologists Discover Ancient Zapotec Tomb

The tomb of a high-ranking member of Zapotec society was found at a 1,200-year-old funerary complex in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca, the National Anthropology and History Institute, or INAH, said. continue reading »

Mexican Specialists Work to Preserve Pre-Columbian Murals

Experts have made significant strides in preserving Mexico's pre-Columbian pictorial heritage, carrying out restoration projects at 44 archaeological sites over the past two years, the National Anthropology and History Institute, or INAH, said. continue reading »

2,500-year-old Altar Unearthed By Mexican Archaeologists

An altar and a stela estimated to date from as early as 800 B.C. were found at the Chalcatzingo archaeological site in the central state of Morelos, Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, or INAH, said. continue reading »

Archaeologists at Mexico’s Pyramid of the Sun Find First Offerings EVER Left at Pyramid

Tuesday, archaeologists from Mexico’s National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH) announced that they had found what they believe to be some of the earliest offerings at the site of Mexico’s tallest pyramid. continue reading »