1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to secondary content



Latino Daily News

Monday May 2, 2011

REPORT:  Corporate Boards Getting Whiter, Earning a “D” for Diversity

REPORT:  Corporate Boards Getting Whiter, Earning a “D” for Diversity

Photo: Minority Board Representation Declines

Click Here to Enlarge Photo

According to a recently released report from the Alliance for Board diversity, in spite of the times, American corporate boards are getting whiter.

Six years after the first ABD Census, this report shows that white men still overwhelmingly dominate corporate boards with few overall gains for minorities and a significant loss of seats for African-American men.

Key findings from this report include:

• In the Fortune 100, between 2004 and 2010:

o Men still dominated boardrooms. In 2010 they held 82.0 percent of board seats; in 2004, 83.1 percent.

o White men have actually increased their share of board seats in corporate America—from 71.2 to 72.9 percent. Minorities and women shared the remainder, with very few seats occupied by Asian Pacific Islanders, Hispanics, or minority women in particular.

o More specifically, African-American women held 2.1 percent of seats; Hispanic women held 0.9 percent; Asian Pacific Islander women held 0.5 percent; African-American men held 4.2 percent; Hispanic men held 3.1 percent; and Asian Pacific Islander men held 1.7 percent.

• Fortune 500 boards were less diverse than Fortune 100 boards.

• More specifically, African-American women held 1.9 percent of Fortune 500 board seats; Hispanic women held 0.7 percent; Asian Pacific Islander women held 0.3 percent; African-American men held 2.7 percent; Hispanic men held 2.3 percent; and Asian Pacific Islander men held 1.8 percent.

• Approximately one-half of Fortune 500 company boards were composed of 20 percent or fewer women and/or minorities.

• Women and minorities were significantly underrepresented in Fortune 500 board leadership positions. White men held 94.9 percent of board chair positions. 

o There was not a single Latina lead director or board chair.