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Latino Daily News

Thursday December 12, 2013

Disturbances in Argentina Lead to 9 Deaths

Disturbances in Argentina Lead to 9 Deaths

Photo: Argentina

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The death toll from the wave of looting in Argentina has risen to nine with the confirmation Wednesday of a third death in the northern province of Tucuman, the region worst hit by the disturbances.

The wave of looting, which was sparked by police protests to demand wage increases, has been brought under control, officials said.

“Officially, we have to talk about three dead, but there is a fourth person who died in the streets, but we do not have details on whether it is linked (to the looting),” Tucuman Health Minister Pablo Yendlin said.

Nearly 100 people injured in the disturbances have been treated over the past 48 hours at hospitals in the provincial capital, San Miguel de Tucuman, located 1,100 kilometers (683 miles) northwest of Buenos Aires, Yendlin said.

Police went back on the streets Wednesday after reaching a deal on pay hikes with Tucuman’s government, allowing life to return to normal as schools and public buildings reopened.

Public transit service also resumed on Wednesday, a day after schools and public buildings were shuttered due to the disturbances.

The governments of 19 other provinces joined Tucuman in cutting deals to increase the pay of police, Cabinet chief Jorge Capitanich said.

“All the conflicts in the Argentine provinces have been resolved. The situation is under control and resolved,” Capitanich said.

The wave of looting and disturbances started on Dec. 3 in Cordoba and spread to other parts of the country as police stayed off the job to press for pay hikes.

The other deaths were reported in Chaco, Cordoba, Buenos Aires, Jujuy and Entre Rios provinces.

Two people were killed and dozens of others injured in a wave of looting that started in the southern city of Bariloche in December 2012 and spread to five other cities in Argentina.

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