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Latino Daily News

Wednesday August 24, 2011

DHS Fails to Reveal the Effectiveness (or Ineffectiveness) of Their Repatriation Flights

DHS Fails to Reveal the Effectiveness (or Ineffectiveness) of Their Repatriation Flights

Photo: DHS Fails to Reveal the Effectiveness (or Ineffectiveness) of Their Repatriation Flights

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As the U.S. Department of Homeland Security continues its repatriation flights, it also continues to face opposition.

In the last eight years, DHS has spent $85 million putting undocumented immigrants on planes and buses sending them more than a thousand miles from the border making it harder to meet up with those that could help get them back across the border.

But while millions are being spent, DHS has not even been able to justify the cost of sending them out of the country verses the cost of them staying in the U.S.

Both the Mexican government and DHS claim the flights are working in lowering the number of those who try to get back north of the border, and deaths at the border have gone down. However, the Arizona Republic obtained government records that state otherwise, showing that hundreds of repatriated migrants are crossing back into the U.S.

Humanitarian groups say the program is not cost effective and migrants deaths at the border are actually increasing. And in 2011 so far, Border Patrol documentation shows that in just the 372.5-mile Tucson, AZ sector, 132 migrants have died.

The Government Accountability Office questions the programs effectiveness, and says they have not been shown evidence to prove it is indeed worth the cost.

USA Today wrote:

[It] is impossible to fully measure the program’s overall effectiveness because the Border Patrol would provide recidivism rates for the program only for fiscal years 2008-10, and only for the weeks the program was in operation. The Arizona Republic requested recidivism rates for all eight years of the program, not just the three provided. The Republic also asked for complete recidivism rates showing how often the program’s participants were re-arrested by the Border Patrol at any time, not just during the program’s operation.

The Border Patrol turned down those requests.