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SundayNovember 25, 2012

Latino Daily News: Bringing You the Latest Hispanic Current Events and News Stories 24/7

To reflect the dynamic interests of our audience, Latino Daily News is an online daily news source and virtual cultural center for and about Latinos. We offer the latest news headlines, as well as innovative and insightful Hispanic current events stories, photos, videos, and commentaries from a Latino perspective, 24/7.

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PEMEX Finds 500 Million Barrels of Crude Oil, Largest Discovery in a Decade

PEMEX Finds 500 Million Barrels of Crude Oil, Largest Discovery in a Decade

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State-owned oil giant Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, said it found reserves of up to 500 million barrels of crude in southern Mexico, a discovery that President Felipe Calderon hailed as the “biggest find” of petroleum on land in the past decade.

The Navegante 1 field is about 20 kilometers (12 miles) from Villahermosa, the capital of the southern state of Tabasco, and yielded light crude at a depth of 6,800 meters (22,295 feet), Pemex officials told Efe.

Initial estimates are that the field contains 500 million proven, possible and probable (3P) barrels of petroleum, but new test wells are planned and could boost reserve estimates to up to 1 billion barrels, Pemex said.

Calderon, who is less than a week away from handing over power to President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto, announced the discovery during the inauguration of a cryogenic plant in Poza Rica, Veracruz, on Sunday.

The oil reserves are in the Cuencas del Sureste geological formation, Pemex said.

Mexico’s oil output totaled almost 3.4 million bpd in 2004, but it has since fallen due to a sharp decline in production at shallow offshore Cantarell, formerly Mexico’s most productive field, and many years of insufficient investment.

The government, however, said last year that Pemex had succeeded in halting a steady annual decline in its reserves dating back to 1979.

A recent oil sector overhaul in Mexico gave the oil monopoly - created when the country’s oil industry was nationalized in 1938 - more freedom to undertake projects with private firms, which are to be hired under incentive-based service contracts.

Pemex announced the discovery last month of the Supremus 1 field in the Gulf of Mexico, a find that officials said would boost Mexico’s production curve to 50 years.

The Supremus 1 well, located some 250 kilometers (155 miles) east of the city of Matamoros, Tamaulipas state, and roughly 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of Mexico’s maritime border with the United States, holds oil amounting to about one-third of Mexico’s total reserves, officials said.

Pemex, the world’s No. 4 oil producer with output of 2.5 million barrels per day (bpd), is the biggest contributor to Mexico’s federal budget and is one of the few oil firms worldwide that handles all aspects of the productive chain, from exploration to distribution and the marketing of end products.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Mexican Teachers Union Threaten Indefinite Strike in Oaxaca

Mexican Teachers Union Threaten Indefinite Strike in Oaxaca

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A section of the SNTE teachers union threatened to call an indefinite strike in all the schools of the southern state of Oaxaca if the regional government does not return to them the centers that it awarded six years ago to another local of the same union.

“If the government continues with the stupidity of knocking us around, of letting Local 59 take over, we’re going on an indefinite strike,” Cesar Martinez, a member of the center for press and advertising commuications at SNTE Local 22, told Efe.

The warnings came after more than 74,000 teachers took part in a day of blockading 37 highways in protest against the aggression suffered by a group of teachers, Martinez said.

Last Thursday, five teachers were seized and presumably attacked while imposing a blockade on a highway near the municipality of Mitla to protest the taking over of some 60 schools by another local of the union, one that is backed by the state government and SNTE leader Elba Esther Gordillo.

On Sunday the teachers plan to stage a “megamarch” in the state and afterwards will hold an assembly to decide if they will again call an indefinite strike.

Oaxaca is among Mexico’s poorest states.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Drug Fugitive Captured, Hash Ring Busted in Spain

Spanish police arrested a drug suspect who was on the lam after escaping from a prison in Sweden in 2003 and dismantled a hashish-trafficking organization he allegedly headed.

During the operation in the southern Spanish provinces of Malaga and Granada, authorities arrested 17 suspects and seized more than 1,500 kilos of hashish, 12 vehicles and 60 cellular phones, police said Saturday.

The gang allegedly smuggled large quantities of hashish into Spain by sea and its reputed leader - identified as S.R. - had settled in the country under a false identity after escaping from a Swedish prison, where he was serving a sentence for drug trafficking.

During the prison break, he attacked the officers who were escorting him to a hospital for treatment for an alleged ailment.

At the time of his arrest, S.R. was carrying a false identity document, the fourth he had used since the investigation was launched.

The extradition process, launched immediately after the fugitive’s arrest, is currently on hold while he is tried for crimes committed in Spain.

He and the other detainees face charges of drug trafficking, membership in a criminal gang, money laundering, document forgery and vehicle theft.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Help NCLR Combat Childhood Hunger This Holiday Season

Help NCLR Combat Childhood Hunger This Holiday Season

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While most Americans celebrate the holidays with friends and family around crowded tables overflowing with home-cooked dishes, millions of Latino children and families will go to bed without any food in their stomachs.

The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) works to improve nutrition in the Latino community by increasing access to federal food assistance programs, resources, and education to ensure that families are able to meet at the dinner table for a healthy meal.  This holiday season, NCLR need your help to sustain these vital programs!

Families across the U.S. struggle to buy enough food for their children and are often forced to choose cheaper, less nutritious options. Latinos in particular have high percentages of food insecurity, early 40% of Latino children go hungry. This Thanksgiving, I encourage you to think about the millions of Latinos who face such disproportionately high rates of hunger and food insecurity.

Please consider making a generous year-end gift to help Latino families in need. Together, we can help ensure that they have access to healthy, nutritious foods so that no child goes to bed hungry.

Read more by HS News Staff →

HS News Contributor: Blog del Narco

HS News Contributor: Blog del Narco

Photo: Blog del Narco by HS News

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Today Mexico’s regional Newspapers are failing to report many of the murders, kidnappings, and violence linked to the nations war against the drug cartels. A recent study by Fundación MEPI, an independent investigative journalism center shows that the threats and intimidation of journalists has routinely caused journalists not to report on the cartels. Journalists feel that with the government unable to protect them that they must choose between their personal safety and professional ethics. This vacuum has led to the news being covered by individuals who have gone “undercover” and operate under a cloak of anonymity to protect themselves and their families.

Blog del Narco has emerged as the premiere source for Mexico’s Narco News with about 3 million unique visits per month. Mexico has become one of the most dangerous countries in the world for freedom of the press. Many reporters have been executed or kidnapped. For his own safety, the author of Blog del Narco has maintained his/her anonymity by only letting two people (whom are very close to him) know his identity. It is a source of great curiosity how Narco Blog gets the stories and the pictures often well before traditional outlets.

HS News is very excited to offer an English version of Blog del Narco .The Blog has been recognized by CNN, Univision, LaJornada, Milenio.com to mention only a few.

We decided to tell people what is actually happening and tell the stories exactly as they happen, without alteration or modifications of convenience,” its author tells Boing Boing. “The main goal of the blog is to help Mexican people to take all necessary measures against the insecurity.”

read more Blog del Narco Here

Read more by HS News Staff →

Peru’s Business Sector to Improve Competitiveness, Stability with $30 Million Loan

Peru is carrying out reforms to increase productivity and business competitiveness in a program financed by a $30 million loan from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

The program follows a previous operation approved in 2010. Its objective is to support reforms currently underway to improve the country’s business environment, strengthen its institutional framework for competitiveness and innovation, among others.

This second operation consists of three components: achieving macroeconomic stability, improving the business environment, and strengthening institutions and tools for supporting business innovation and competitiveness.

Over the years, Peru has significantly improved its standing on the World Bank’s Doing Businessindex, today ranking highest in Latin America and the Caribbean after Chile. In addition, the Global Competitiveness Index, developed by the World Economic Forum, ranks Peru 67 among 142 countries in 2011-2012, an improvement of 11 places compared to the 2009-2010 index.

However, the main obstacles to competitiveness in Peru continue to be weak institutions and infrastructure and deficiencies in innovation and business management.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Mexican Exhibition Explores the Link Between Mayan Culture and Time

Mexican Exhibition Explores the Link Between Mayan Culture and Time

Photo: Mayan exhibit (INAH)

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A new Mayan exhibit at the Mexican capital’s National Museum of Anthropology shows the influence of time on the rituals and daily life of that pre-Columbian civilization.

“We’re used to seeing time from our own perspective, in a linear way, with a beginning and an end, but for Mesoamerican cultures, on the contrary, time is a cyclic reality,” Alfonso de Maria y Campos, director of the National Anthropology and History Institute, or INAH, told Efe during Friday’s inauguration.

Nearly 100 objects of ceramic, metal, shell and stone on loan from the Yucutan Regional Museum, or “Canton Palace,” illustrate the advanced understanding of astronomy, mathematics and writing achieved by that civilization, at its height between the years 300 A.D. and 1,000 A.D.

The exhibit, organized by INAH, explains some of the calendar systems they used, including the Tzolk’in of 260 days, the Haab’o civil calendar of 365 days, and the so-called “long-count” (Tziikhaab) that covers a span of 5,125 years.

The latter system, whose current stage began on Aug. 11 of the year 3114 B.C. and will end on Dec. 21, 2012 with the beginning of a new era, gave rise to the idea that the Mayas prophesied the end of the world, a notion repeatedly denied by indigenous and scientific authorities.

“This is an academic exhibition that shows that the end of the world will not be on Dec. 21, but that it is a very important date on the Mayas’ long-count calendar,” the academic said.

Read more by HS News Staff →

IACHR Condemns Murder of Mexican Journalist

IACHR Condemns Murder of Mexican Journalist

Photo: Adrián Silva Moreno

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The Office of the Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) condemns the murder of journalist Adrián Silva Moreno, which took place on November 14 in Tehuacán, Puebla, and urges federal and local Mexican authorities to take urgent action and activate all legal instruments available for identifying and punishing both the perpetrators of and the masterminds behind this crime.

According to the information received, Adrián Silva Moreno and his companion, identified as Misrael López González, were murdered on November 14.

The crime could be connected to information the reporter had on gasoline theft in the region. Adrián Silva Moreno contributed to a number of local media outlets, including: Diario Puntual, Radio 11.70 of Tehuacán and Global México.

The Office of the Special Rapporteur expresses its deep concern over the repetition of extremely serious attacks on the media in Mexico. This year, at least eight journalists and media employees have been murdered.

As the Office of the Special Rapporteur expressed in its Special Report on Freedom of Expression in Mexico, attacks on the media in that country have forced numerous media outlets to stop publishing news on corruption and organized crime as a security measure, thereby depriving Mexican society of basic information.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Bill O’Reilly is Right, I Do Want Things

Bill O’Reilly is Right, I Do Want Things

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By Mary Moreno, NewsTaco

It’s not often that I agree with Bill O’Reilly, and I’ve definitely never been moved to write about it. But on the eve of the election, as votes were being counted, O’Reilly, the FOX News personality, was on FOX giving his opinion on why it appeared that President Obama was poised to win.

The anchors on FOX seemed genuinely perplexed about how despite the network’s four-year campaign to defeat President Obama, he was going to win reelection. “How did we get to this point,” the anchor asked O’Reilly.

O’Reilly’s response was that there are non-traditional people (code for people of color, women and LGBT) who want things, stuff, and these people voted for President Obama.
He’s right. I voted for President Obama and I do want things, stuff. And if only people who want things voted for President Obama, I’m surprised he didn’t get 100 percent of the vote. We should all want things from our government.

I know I do want stuff.Image

I want bridges that don’t collapse and roads without potholes that adequately accommodate traffic. I want modern, high performing schools in every neighborhood, regardless of the income of the people who live there. I want safe, affordable housing available to everyone.

I want corporations that don’t rack up record profits but pay little to no taxes. I want a regulated Wall Street that doesn’t gamble recklessly knowing that if they lose, we’ll pick up the pieces, but if they win, they get to buy another vacation home, another boat.

I want good, secure jobs for my neighbors that allow them to live comfortably, without worrying about not having enough to feed and shelter their families. I want them to also be able to visit a doctor whenever they to and be able to obtain the medicines they need to stay in good health.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Mexico To Explore UN Torture Charges

Mexico To Explore UN Torture Charges

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The Mexican government has agreed to “study carefully” the charges made by the United Nations’ Committee Against Torture, which said it was concerned about the use of torture in Mexico during the interrogation of people detained arbitrarily.

“The government of Mexico accepts responsibly the committee’s recommendations and commits itself to studying them carefully in order to guarantee their adequate implementation nationwide,” a communique signed jointly by the foreign ministry, interior ministry and the Attorney General’s Office, said.

The communique added that “no impunity exists for committing the crime of torture, which is not now nor ever will be tolerated.”

In its report on Mexico, the United Nations committee said that, for example, it views with concern the number of reports saying that, during the period before a prisoner is handed over to the AG’s office, the person is tortured and abused in order to “obtain forced confessions and self-incriminating statements.”

Such statements are “used to cover up irregularities committed in the detention center,” the committee’s report said.

Read more by HS News Staff →

1.3 Million Women Received Unnecessary And Invasive Cancer Treatment, Study Finds

1.3 Million Women Received Unnecessary And Invasive Cancer Treatment, Study Finds

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By Igor Volsky, ThinkProgress

Routine mammograms have caused more than a million U.S. women to receive “unnecessary and invasive cancer treatments over the last 30 years,” a new study finds, detecting tumors that are harmless.

The results come after the government’s Preventive Task Force issued recommendations in 2009 advising primary care physicians against recommending mammograms to women under 40 years of age. Those guidelines stirred political outcry on both sides of the aisle and slowed down work on President Obama’s health care law.

But the study shines new doubt “over the effectiveness of an already controversial cancer screening tool that is aimed at detecting tumors before they spread and become more difficult to treat”:

Their analysis showed that, since mammograms became standard in the United States, the number of early-stage breast cancers detected has doubled — in recent years, doctors found tumors in 234 women out of 100,000. But in that same period, the rate of women diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer has dropped just eight percent — from 102 to 94 cases out of 100,000.

“We estimated that breast cancer was overdiagnosed — i.e., tumors were detected on screening that would never have led to clinical symptoms — in 1.3 million US women in the past 30 years,” authors Gilbert Welch of Dartmouth Medical School and Archie Bleyer of the Oregon Health & Science University, wrote in a study published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“We estimated that in 2008, breast cancer was overdiagnosed in more than 70,000 women; this accounted for 31% of all breast cancers diagnosed,” they added. These women likely received major medical interventions — including surgery, radiology, hormone therapy and chemotherapy — that ought only to be used when absolutely necessary, the authors stressed.

They also concluded the significant drop in breast cancer deaths can be best explained by the improvement in treatments, rather than the early detection through mammograms.

Recent research has confirmed these findings. For instance a 2011 paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that while “some women need mammograms more frequently than others,” a more complex approach to mammography “based on personal risk factors such as age, breast density, family history of breast cancer and even a woman’s personal preference” could help reduce overtreatment and unnecessary testing.

The science encourages women and doctors to consider harms of additional testing, including radiation exposure, the anxiety associated with false-positive findings on the initial examination, and the costs of additional imaging.

Read more at ThinkProgress →



SundayNovember 25, 2012