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SaturdayNovember 24, 2012

Latino Daily News: Bringing You the Latest Hispanic Current Events and News Stories 24/7

To reflect the dynamic interests of our audience, Latino Daily News is an online daily news source and virtual cultural center for and about Latinos. We offer the latest news headlines, as well as innovative and insightful Hispanic current events stories, photos, videos, and commentaries from a Latino perspective, 24/7.

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Guatemala Says Los Zetas Responsible for Massacre

Guatemala Says Los Zetas Responsible for Massacre

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The killing of seven men at a medical complex in this capital was the work of drug-cartel enforcers, Guatemala’s interior minister said Friday.

Mauricio Lopez Bonilla told reporters that the intended target of Thursday’s attack was reputed kingpin Jairo Orellana Morales, who escaped unharmed.

The 30-year-old Orellana drove away when he noticed gunmen apparently waiting for him at the building in an affluent, gated community on the south side of Guatemala City.

The kingpin left behind his seven bodyguards, who were disarmed and then shot execution-style.

The attack on Orellana was ordered by the Mexico-based Los Zetas cartel, an intelligence source told Efe, in a bid to bolster control of key smuggling routes in Guatemala.

Orellana went to the medical complex for an outpatient surgical procedure.

One of the seven men killed Thursday was Santiago Coc, who was a member of an elite police anti-drug unit until his dismissal from the force in 2008.

More than 100 Zetas have been captured in Guatemala since 2008, when the cartel moved into the Central American country.

The Zetas, founded by deserters from a U.S.-trained Mexican special forces unit, are blamed for several mass killings in Guatemala.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Border Patrol Arrests Human Smuggler, 14 Undocumented Immigrants

Border Patrol Arrests Human Smuggler, 14 Undocumented Immigrants

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Border Patrol agents assigned to the Indio, Calif. station stopped a tractor trailer with 14 people inside and arrested one suspected alien smuggler at the Highway 86 checkpoint located between Westmorland and Salton City, Calif.

The incident occurred at around 1:30 p.m., after a Border Patrol canine team alerted to an orange 2001 Freightliner tractor trailer. The vehicle was referred to secondary for further inspection. Inside the trailer, agents discovered 13 men and 1 woman that were citizens of Mexico and later determined to be in the United States illegally. Agents also discovered 2.5 pounds of marijuana with an estimated street value of $5,800.

The operator of the tractor, a 28-year-old U.S citizen, was placed under arrest on suspicion of alien smuggling. The 14 undocumented aliens were also arrested.

The suspect and illegal aliens are in U.S. Border Patrol custody pending further investigation. U.S. Border Patrol seized both the marijuana and vehicle involved in the incident.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Dominican Republic to Improve Access to Drinking Water With $25 Million Loan

Dominican Republic to Improve Access to Drinking Water With $25 Million Loan

Photo: Drinking water Dominican Republic

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The Dominican Republic will improve water services for 329,000 inhabitants in the metropolitan area of Santiago de los Caballeros with a $25 million loan from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

The project is expected to enable water service for at least 12 continuous hours per day for 211,000 people. Moreover, the project aims to improve the energy efficiency of water service operators and overall management of the service through investments in infrastructure and institutional strengthening support to CORAASAN (Water and Sewerage Corporation of Santiago).

The project is expected to decrease both losses of water delivered to the system and energy costs.“Through this project, the Bank will support the Dominican Republic to increase the quality and continuity of drinking water in urban and suburban areas, thereby improving operational efficiency and service,” said Javier Grau Benaiges, IDB project team leader.

Project components include implementing better pumping systems, network sectorization, pipe replacement, improved feedback systems, and support to service governance with corporate governance programs and information systems, among others.

In recent years the continuity of potable water supply services in Santiago has been affected by strong population growth in peri-urban areas, particularly in the areas of higher elevation, due to, among other factors, increased immigration from other areas of the country.

Read more by HS News Staff →

INFOGRAPHIC: If The World Were 100 People

INFOGRAPHIC: If The World Were 100 People

Photo: 100People.org

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What would the Earth’s population look like if there were only 100 people?  What percentage of the population would Latin Americans make up?  How many would speak Spanish? What about literacy rates?

The 100 People Foundation have created this thought provoking infographic depicting a world of only 100 people.

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Read more by HS News Staff →

Marc Anthony Breaks Ground on Orphanage in Dominican Republic

Marc Anthony Breaks Ground on Orphanage in Dominican Republic

Photo: Marc Anthony in Dominican Republic

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Singer Marc Anthony inaugurated Friday the construction of a modern orphanage that will provide a home for dozens of children in the eastern province of La Romana.

“I’m super-excited, this is the beginning of a great project and we hope very soon to have the facilities ready for these kids,” Anthony told a press conference at the contruction site.

The project is a joint undertaking by the singer and businessman Henry Cardenas on behalf of the Children of Christ Orphanage.

“We have to help these kids, many of them have a lot of talent but if it isn’t given a chance it could be lost,” said a genuinely moved Anthony, who was accompanied by his girlfriend, the Venezuelan model Shannon de Lima.

The singer and actor seemed to make an effort to hold back the tears when 12-year-old Miguel Angel Gomez thanked him.

“Thanks for remembering that we’re human beings too…thanks to everyone here for being with us on an afternoon that is so wonderful and important for us…may God bless you,” the boy said.

The orphanage will be built on 10,000 sq. meters (2 1/2 acres) donated by the Central Romana sugar corporation and will include a kitchen, laundry, dining room, library, chapel, classrooms, dormitories, teachers’ living room, workshop area, business center and a baseball diamond.

The first stage with room to house some 90 youngsters is expected to be finished by next September.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Latino Voters Call on Lawmakers to Invest in Children

Latino Voters Call on Lawmakers to Invest in Children

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An analysis of nationwide election eve poll released today by the First Focus Campaign for Children shows overwhelming support from Latino voters for a wide range of federal investments in America’s children at levels higher than voters of all demographics and political affiliations.

More than 9-in-10 Latino voters support increasing investments in child health, and more than 8-in-10 Latino voters support increasing investments in family tax credits, children of immigrants, child poverty reduction, and the federal government’s focus on children.
 
Latino voters backed a wide range of federal initiatives to improve the well-being of children at higher levels of support than all voters including:

    A 92 percent to 5 percent margin of Latino voters say protecting children’s health through the extension of the Children’s Health Insurance Program is important to them, compared to 83 percent of all voters.
    An 84 percent to 12 percent margin of Latino voters favor enacting the DREAM Act to offer qualifying students who entered the United States as undocumented immigrant children an opportunity to earn lawful permanent residency and a path to U.S. citizenship, compared to 68 percent of all voters.
    An 89 percent to 6 percent margin of Latino voters favor protecting elements of family tax credits, the Child Tax Credit and the Earned Income Tax Credit that will expire this year unless Congress acts, compared to 81 percent of all voters.
    An 84 percent to 14 percent margin of Latino voters want Congress and the White House to deliver concrete plans to reduce child poverty in half within ten years, compared to 82 percent of all voters.
    A 85 percent to 9 percent margin of Latino voters support creating a bipartisan “Children’s Commission” to recommend solutions to the problems facing children, compared to 78 percent of all voters.
    A 78 percent to 12 percent margin of Latino voters want the president to create a Children’s Budget to provide an official accounting of federal investments in children, compared to 66 percent of all voters.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Boxing Star Hector “Macho” Camacho Dies, Unable to Donate Organs

Boxing Star Hector “Macho” Camacho Dies, Unable to Donate Organs

Photo: Hector "Macho" Camacho

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The organs of late Puerto Rican boxing icon Hector “Macho” Camacho cannot be donated because he was kept on life support for too long, the head of San Juan’s Centro Medico trauma facility, Dr. Ernesto Torres, said.

The 50-year-old Camacho, who was declared clinically brain dead on Thursday, two days after being shot in the face outside a bar in metropolitan San Juan, was removed from a respirator shortly after going into cardiac arrest in the wee hours of Saturday.

A man accompanying Camacho was killed in the same shooting.

Torres said at a press conference Saturday that he told the former fighter’s mother, Maria Matias, that her son’s organs could not be donated due to the length of time he had been artificially kept alive.

Macho Camacho won world junior lightweight, lightweight and junior welterweight crowns in the 1980s. His last title fight was a 1997 loss by unanimous decision to then-welterweight champion Oscar De La Hoya.

The Puerto Rican, who has battled problems with drugs and alcohol, retired from the ring in 2009 with a lifetime record of 79-6-3.

Camacho spent two months behind bars in Mississippi for a 2005 burglary and his wife filed several domestic abuse complaints against him before ultimately divorcing him.

Police are investigating the double homicide but still have not determined a motive.

Read more by HS News Staff →

A Tale of Two Communities and Contaminated Water

A Tale of Two Communities and Contaminated Water

Photo: NewsTaco

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By Jose Gonzalez, NewsTaco

This past week two stories stood out identifying two communities of color different in many ways but connected by a common challenge: contaminated water.

One story, from the New York Times, pointed out the issues with contaminated water faced in small predominately Latino communities in the Central Valley, California. “Don’t drink the water” is no joke here, but rather a sad reality and norm for low-income communities of color. It should be fair to ask HOW this happen as well as WHY. As the NY Times story points out:

“It is the grim result of more than half a century in which chemical fertilizers, animal wastes, pesticides and other substances have infiltrated aquifers, seeping into the groundwater and eventually into the tap.”

The irony is that many of these communities are farm-working communities that work the very fields and industries that poison their drinking water —and in that process these communities bear the cost of food production in more than one way. Image

First, we rely on communities like these to serve as a labor force for the food we consume, the dairies and crops of California’s bountiful bread basket. But the political and economic forces that govern these areas keep many of these communities in poverty with low wages or uneven enforcement of the few regulations in place to protect them. Second, these communities struggle with limited access to the basic needs some of us take for granted, such as drinking water.

These communities are asked to pay twice for water. They pay first for the tap and second in the purchase of bottled drinking water. Furthermore this pushes habits we consider detrimental to sustainable living: In the larger conservation community we stress the detrimental environmental effects of bottled water and yet that is the safest and healthiest option for these communities absent state and regulatory action.

The other story exposed the loopholes benefiting oil and gas companies to dump contaminated water on the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming.  NPR broke the story, specifically pointing out how what goes on there is illegal in most of the country— with the implication that a reservation is not seen as like most of the country. 

The shocking part is that this is permitted, directly and indirectly, by the Environmental Protection Agency, the very agency that is supposed to regulate this type of practice to protect people and the environment. As this article from KERA News points out, quoting a Duke University environmental scientist:

“I was shocked when I heard this. I was very surprised this was allowed. It’s just something that we should know better by now. We should know that dumping our waste onto the surface of the ground is a bad solution…Are we doing something on tribal lands we wouldn’t allow somewhere else? I think that’s something we have to be asking ourselves.”

Those are good questions, but questions and issues that not all communities face— Yet common enough in communities of color.

This article was first published in NewsTaco.

NewsTaco provides you with innovative and insightful news, critique, analysis and opinion from a Latino perspective in a 24-hour world.

Read more at NewsTaco →

Black Friday Entices Mexicans to Cross the Border for Shopping Deals

Black Friday Entices Mexicans to Cross the Border for Shopping Deals

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Many Mexicans have adopted the American tradition of Black Friday and cross the border to go shopping, and so contribute to the regional economy.

The typical Mexican spends around $300 during a post-Thanksgiving shopping expedition to the United States, according to Alejandro Diaz Bautista, a researcher at Mexico’s College of the Northern Border.

“Black Friday represents one of the most economically important days for the San Diego region because of the boost it gets from shoppers coming across the border,” he said.

Thousands of residents of the Mexican state of Baja California start crossing the border very early in the day to take advantage of discounts that range from 20 to 80 percent.

Tom Fallon, manager of Las Americas mall just a few steps from the border, described this as the most important day of the year for sales.

“The market south of the border is extremely important - people from Mexico come to the shopping center non-stop, many arriving from the airport in Tijuana,” he said.

Tijuana resident Cesar Montijo said he comes every year on Black Friday to buy Christmas presents.

“There’s more movement going on now than last year - there are also good offers, we can take more stuff home for less money than last year,” he said.

Raul Palacios, who was traveling with his wife, said they planned which stores to visit before they came.

“It’s different every year, more people come here, store hours are longer and sometimes you really do find things cheaper. We planned which stores to see before we came.”

Javier Gutierrez, a residente of Ciudad Obregon, Sonora, said he happened to be in Tijuana on business and took the opportunity to come north and get to know this American tradition.

“The offers are really attractive. What I’m looking for above all are clothes for my family,” he said.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Hostess To Shut Down After Failed Union Talks

Hostess To Shut Down After Failed Union Talks

Photo: Hostess Brands Inc.

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A U.S. bankruptcy court accepted the request by giant U.S. bread and cake producer Hostess Brands Inc. to shut down due to a strike that has derailed its recovery plan, a move that means that some 18,500 workers will be laid off.

New York Bankruptcy Judge Robert Drain approved the firm’s request for an orderly closure of its operations and the sale of its assets, the firm said in a communique.

The judge’s decision came after the firm and the union that staged the walkout were unable to reach agreement during a mediation session requested last Monday by the magistrate.

Hostess will now close 33 bakeries, 565 distribution centers and 570 outlet stores all over the country and will sell its most famous brands.

The company, based in Irving, Texas, had declared a suspension of payments to suppliers for the second time last January to try and restructure its operations with an eye toward reducing its huge debt. It also blamed its inability to return to profitability on union wages and pension costs.

The bakery company’s iconic products include Twinkies, with which Hostess launched its operations in 1930, and Ding Dongs.

Several companies have already expressed an interest in buying some of the firm’s brands.

Read more by HS News Staff →



SaturdayNovember 24, 2012