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MondaySeptember 17, 2012

Latino Daily News: Bringing You the Latest Hispanic Current Events and News Stories 24/7

To reflect the dynamic interests of our audience, Latino Daily News is an online daily news source and virtual cultural center for and about Latinos. We offer the latest news headlines, as well as innovative and insightful Hispanic current events stories, photos, videos, and commentaries from a Latino perspective, 24/7.

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Boxer “Maravilla” Martinez to Undergo Hand Surgery After Winning WBC Middleweight Title

Boxer “Maravilla” Martinez to Undergo Hand Surgery After Winning WBC Middleweight Title

Photo: Sergio "Maravilla" Martinez to Have Hand Surgery

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Argentina’s Sergio “Maravilla” Martinez, who reclaimed the WBC middleweight title last weekend by defeating Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. in Las Vegas, broke a hand during the fight and will be operated on in Spain for a knee injury.

Promoter Lou Di Bella announced that, besides the broken hand, Martinez suffered an injury to the ligaments in one of his knees, probably produced by a fall he took near the end of the fight.

The 37-year-old Argentine boxer was admitted for several hours to a Las Vegas hospital. Members of his team said that the seriousness of the injury will be determined in the coming days, when the inflammation subsides and it can be examined more closely.

“His hand was broken, he got knocked down, his knee was messed up, but he got up and he didn’t look to hold. He looked to fight,” DiBella told ESPN. “Sergio Martinez is a man’s man. He could have held and grabbed Chavez, or just stay away, but that is not who he is. He wanted to fight to the end and knock the kid out.”

After being handily outboxed by his rival during the fight’s first 11 rounds, Chavez Jr. harshly punished the Argentine in the last round and was just a hair away from knocking him out.

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Brazilian 17-year-old Star Rhythmic Gymnast Killed in Car Accident

Brazilian 17-year-old Star Rhythmic Gymnast Killed in Car Accident

Photo: Eduarda Mello de Queiroz

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A 17-year-old star rhythmic gymnast died in a car accident over the weekend in Viana, a city in Brazil’s Espiritu Santo state, police said.

Eduarda Mello de Queiroz, who placed second in the national championships, died Sunday when the car she was riding in with two other people went into a ravine and hit a tree.

Luiz Felipe Costa, who was driving the automobile, is hospitalized in serious condition, while the third person in the vehicle, gymnast Natalia Gaudio, sustained only minor injuries, police said.

Mello de Queiroz, who was considered one of the most promising athletes in Brazil, won second place in the national team championships in late August.

She was the daughter of Monika Queiroz, who coached the Brazilian rhythmic gymnastics teams that competed at the 2007 Pan American Games in Rio de Janeiro and the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics.

“This is a tough and very sad time for the family, and for all of Brazilian gymnastics,” Brazilian Gymnastics Federation official Klayler Mourthe told the media.

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Brazilian Supreme Court Judge Says There is “No Doubt” Lawmakers Took Bribes

Brazilian Supreme Court Judge Says There is “No Doubt” Lawmakers Took Bribes

Photo: Brazilian Supreme Court Judge Says There is "No Doubt" Lawmakers Took Bribes

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Members of Congress traded votes for money during the first two years of Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva’s 2003-2011 tenure as president, one of the judges in Brazil’s corruption “trial of the century” said Monday.

Supreme Court Judge Joaquim Barbosa gave a detailed account of the cash that Lula’s Workers Party, or PT, paid to lawmakers of four other parties to secure passage of the administration’s legislative agenda.

Backed by documents submitted by prosecutors, Barbosa said “there’s no doubt that votes were bought” and that the money was paid “before, during and after” the bills were voted on in the lower house.

Among the cases in question, the judge cited a controversial tax reform passed in September 2003 and a pension overhaul voted on that same year.

“There’s plenty of documentation and there’s no doubt that a scheme existed for buying votes,” Barbosa said.

Former presidential chief of staff Jose Dirceu and 37 other people, including two former Cabinet ministers and erstwhile congresspersons, are facing charges that range from money laundering and tax evasion to fraud and criminal conspiracy.

Also in the dock are leaders of the PMDB, PP, PTB and PL parties.

The scheme came to light in the summer of 2005 after PL lawmaker Roberto Jefferson accused the PT of having bribed legislators of other parties to build the congressional majority that the government failed to obtain at the polls in 2002.

“Despite the defense attorneys’ attempts to prove that the bribes were fictitious, the accusations are very far from being mere political revenge,” Barbosa said, adding that “it wouldn’t be the first time a crime has been reported because of a falling-out among its perpetrators.”

Barbosa noted that former PT treasurer Delubio Soares said his party gave the leaders of the other four parties a total of 55 million reais ($27.5 million at current exchange rates).

He cited Soares’ insistence in his statement that these amounts were meant to cover campaign expenses and not to “buy” support, which would reduce the matter to campaign-finance violations no longer subject to prosecution.

The judge particularly noted, however, the support the PT obtained from the PP, a party that “was always diametrically opposed” ideologically to Lula’s party.

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Congress Urged to Move Along the National Museum of American Latino Legislation

Congress Urged to Move Along the National Museum of American Latino Legislation

Photo: American Latino Museum Project

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Legislation to designate a location for the museum on the National Mall, the Smithsonian American Latino Museum Act, is still pending in Congress, yet grassroots support has remained strong and continues to build steadily. Through a combined effort of social media and direct community engagement, Friends of the American Latino Museum (FRIENDS) have amassed a base of over 300,000 fans, followers, and supporters of the cause.

In addition, the FRIENDS have amassed a bipartisan list of over 50 members of the House and Senate who support the museum initiative. That list will continue to be a focus for the remainder of the year with the goal of hitting 100 members of Congress.

FRIENDS, is a 501(c)(3) created to push forward the American Latino Museum initiative.

Passing the Smithsonian American Latino Museum Act would designate space along the National Mall to the project and create a landmark to the culture and contributions of the Latino community to the founding and strengthening of our nation.

“This event is another exciting milestone in the journey toward an American Latino Museum,” said Jonathan Yorba, chair of FRIENDS. “We call on members of the House and Senate to support the museum legislation, and we call on all Americans who support this project to join our effort on our website or social networks. An historic achievement like this one does not come quickly or easily, but through the hard work of our supporters, this museum is closer than ever to becoming a reality.”

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Celebrating Citizenship Day 2012 and Remembering the Immigrant Potential

Celebrating Citizenship Day 2012 and Remembering the Immigrant Potential

Photo: Power of Immigrant Voter

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President Barack Obama declared today Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, encouraging Americans to reaffirm their commitment to the rights and obligations of citizenship during a week-long observance commemorating the 225th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution.

Congress designated Sept. 17, 1952, as the first Constitution Day and Citizenship Day in recognition of Americans who strive to uphold the duties and responsibilities of citizenship.  In celebration of the day, the Immigration Policy Center sent out a reminder of the potential and power of the immigrant vote:

For many aspiring immigrants, achieving citizenship means full participation in civic life—and that means the right to vote. Every year, thousands of immigrants become naturalized U.S. citizens and exercise their new right. In the 2010 national elections, naturalized citizens comprised 6.4% of all voters. The voter registration rate among immigrants as a whole has risen since 2000. Just as importantly, a growing number of U.S.-born children of immigrants are now coming of age and becoming voters.

However, the full potential of the immigrant vote has not been reached. There are more than eight million legal immigrants in the United States who are eligible to naturalize but have not yet done so. The latent electoral power of these voters-in-waiting is enormous. In many parts of the country their votes could potentially swing elections.

There are numerous counties across the country where the number of Legal Permanent Residents (LPRs) who have arrived since 1985 exceeds the margin of victory in the Obama-McCain election. Moreover, the voter rolls of many counties would grow dramatically if LPRs who are eligible to naturalize actually did so and registered to vote. Although this could not happen in time for the 2012 election cycle, it could make a difference in future elections.

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Messi and Ronaldo: Two Stars, Four Teams

Messi and Ronaldo: Two Stars, Four Teams

Photo: Messi and Ronaldo: Two Stars, Four Teams

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Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo are pulling double duty at the moment. Each is helping their country qualify for the 2014 World Cup while also playing for their Spanish League teams.

During Argentina’s recent CONMEBOL qualifiers for the 2014 World Cup, Messi and his teammates managed a draw against Peru and a win against Paraguay. After 7 of 16 matches, Argentina leads the South America World Cup qualifying teams with 14 points.

For Portugal, Ronaldo and his team have won twice in UEFA qualifiers for the 2014 WC. The wins were against Luxembourg and Azerbaijan. Portugal’s points now have them atop UEFA’s Group F alongside with Russia.

On Saturday, Ronaldo and Real Madrid were struck with their second loss in a row. Ronaldo was also slightly injured while being fouled by a Sevilla player. In the end, Madrid fell to Sevilla 0-1.

That same day, Messi and Barcelona finished with a 4-1 victory at home against Getafe. Superstar Messi scored twice in the 74th and 78th minute (goals 2 and 3).

Barceleno is currently at the top of the La Liga, with Ronaldo and Madrid eight points behind. Across both the World Cup and La Liga matches, Ronaldo has so far scored 6 goals, while Messi has scored 10 in the season.

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LATINO BLOTTER: Texas Woman Bites Sister’s Nose Off During Fight

LATINO BLOTTER: Texas Woman Bites Sister’s Nose Off During Fight

Photo: LATINO BLOTTER: Texas Woman Bites Sister's Nose Off During Fight

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Sibling rivalry can occasionally lead to a fist fight, but rarely does it lead to a sister biting off another sister’s nose, but that is exactly what happened between Lluvia Rodriguez and her sister.

Back in July, Rodriguez, 29, and her sister, Ivon, went out to a club. When they returned home, Rodriguez began arguing with her husband. Attempting to diffuse the situation, Ivon tried to pull her sister away from the fight. Instead, Ivon ended up in a fight with her sister as well.

According to Officer M. M. Wallace of the Houston Police Department’s Special Crimes Unit, Rodriguez then bit down on her sister’s nose, “severing it and detaching her nose from her face.”

Click2Houston says the injured sister was rushed to Ben Taub Hospital. Doctors were thankfully able to reattach her nose.

Though the incident occurred on July 14, police did not charge Lluvia Rodriguez until last week. She is now facing changes of aggravated assault of a family member. The charge is a second-degree felony with a sentence of up to 20 years in prison.

Rodriguez remains in jail and while Ivon says she has forgiven her sister, she’s not upset she remains in jail. A protection order is still pending and bond has not yet been set.

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STUDY:  Cancer Top Killer of Hispanics Not Heart Disease

A new report from American Cancer Society researchers finds that despite declining death rates, cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S.

Among non-Hispanic whites and African Americans, heart disease remains the number one cause of death.

The figures come from Cancer Statistics for Hispanics/Latinos 2012, appearing in the journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, which has been produced every three years since 2000.

The report says that in 2012, an estimated 112,800 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed and 33,200 cancer deaths will occur among Hispanics. Among U.S. Hispanics during the past ten years of available data (2000-2009), cancer incidence rates declined by 1.7% per year among men and 0.3% per year among women.

Hispanics have lower incidence and death rates than non-Hispanic whites for all cancers combined and for the four most common cancers (breast, prostate, lung and bronchus, and colorectum). The most notable example is lung cancer, for which rates among Hispanics are about one-half those of non-Hispanic whites. The risk of lung cancer is lower among Hispanics because they have historically been less likely to smoke cigarettes than non-Hispanic whites.

In contrast, Hispanics have higher incidence and mortality rates for cancers of the stomach, liver, uterine cervix, and gallbladder, reflecting greater exposure to cancer-causing infectious agents, lower rates of screening for cervical cancer, and possibly genetic factors. Incidence and death rates for cervical cancer are 50% to 70% higher in Hispanic women compared to non-Hispanic whites. In addition, Hispanics are diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease more often than non-Hispanic whites for most cancer sites.

Hispanics in the U.S. are an extremely diverse group because they originate from many different countries (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and Cuba). As a result, cancer patterns among Hispanic subpopulations vary substantially. For example, in Florida the cancer death rate among Cuban men is double that of Mexican men.

Cuban men are much more likely to smoke than Dominican men (21 percent versus 6 percent, respectively) and obesity prevalence among Mexican and Puerto Rican men is double that among Dominican men. There are also differences between Hispanic subgroups in screening utilization; Mexican women are less likely to have had a recent mammogram than Dominican women (62 percent versus 78 percent, respectively).

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Scientist Uses Microscope to Photograph Drinks Like the Piña Colada and Tequila (PHOTOS)

Scientist Uses Microscope to Photograph Drinks Like the Piña Colada and Tequila (PHOTOS)

Photo: Scientist Creates Art Using Microscope to Photograph Your Favorite Cocktails

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Ever wonder what your liquor of choice looks like under a microscope? Yeah, we didn’t either. However, these shots have made us rethink our lack of interest and now have us wondering what everything looks like under a microscope lens.

The photographs were taken by scientist Michael Davidson with a Standard Light Microscope. The images are made by crystallizing the cocktails and putting them on a slide.

The website for BevShots, which sells these amazing images:

In 1992, … Davidson stumbled upon a genius idea right under his nose - literally. In his 25 year career through the many facets of microscopy, he had taken photographs under the microscope of a collection of items - DNA, biochemicals and vitamins.

Looking for novel ways to fund his Florida State University lab, Davidson decided to take his microphotographs to businesses for possible commercial opportunities.  While presenting his pictures to established retail companies, one necktie manufacturer changed his creative direction with just one word – cocktails.

BevShots was created after the successful creation and sale of drink-donned neckties between 1995 and 2002.

Check out our favorites — the Piña Colada, Tequila and the Margarita – below. Also, be sure to see more here.

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MISSING: FBI Asking For Help Locating Girl:  Kaelynne Paez, Age 13

MISSING: FBI Asking For Help Locating Girl:  Kaelynne Paez, Age 13

Photo: MISSING: FBI Asking For Help Locating Girl: Kaelynne Paez, Age 13

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The FBI is seeking the public’s assistance to locate Kaelynne Paez, age 13, of Heber, California. Paez was last seen the morning of September 9, 2012 in the vicinity of Heber Avenue, in Heber, California. Heber is in Imperial County in Southern California, which is just north of the U.S.-Mexico border.

It appears the girl created profiles on a few adult dating websites, claiming to be 19 years old. The FBI has not given many more details about the girl’s online life, but many wonder if she ran off with someone she met online or worse, was lured by an online predator.

Paez is described as a 13-year-old Hispanic girl with black hair and brown eyes. She is roughly 5’5 and 150 lbs.

Anyone with information concerning the whereabouts of Paez is asked to contact the FBI at telephone number (760) 335-5600 or (858) 565-1255.

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Peru’s Shining Path Guerilla Abimael Guzman’s Wife In Trouble for Giving Interview

Peru’s Shining Path Guerilla Abimael Guzman’s Wife In Trouble for Giving Interview

Photo: Shining Path's Elena Iparraguirre

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The wife of Shining Path founder Abimael Guzman has been transferred to another prison over security concerns, with the move coming soon after she granted an interview to a foreign magazine, Peruvian National Penitentiary Institute director Jose Luis Perez Guadalupe said.

Elena Iparraguirre was moved from the maximum-security prison in Chorrillos to the Virgen de Fatima prison in the same Lima district last Thursday along with 24 other inmates, Perez Guadalupe said.

Iparraguirre and the other inmates had been mixed in with common criminals and officials had decided back in March to move them, Perez Guadalupe said.

“If we see that there is a security failure, we are not going to wait for it to repeat itself,” the National Penitentiary Institute director said.

Britain’s The Economist magazine published an interview with Iparraguirre, the Shining Path’s former No. 2 leader, this month.

Iparraguirre, who was convicted of terrorism, told the prestigious publication that the Shining Path was defeated militarily but not politically.

The former rebel leader, however, did not recognize the leaders of the remnants of the Shining Path operating in the Upper Huallaga Valley and in the Valley of the Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro rivers, or VRAEM, region.

Iparraguirre, who was known as “Comrade Miriam,” was transferred to a new prison because “no inmate can give statements to the media or give any information,” Council of Ministers chairman Juan Jimenez said.

“We’ll see later what the penalty will be for violating the prison rules,” Jimenez said, adding that an investigation would be conducted.

Between 79 percent and 89 percent of respondents in a poll published Sunday by the Apoyo firm said the Shining Path should not have the right to participate in upcoming elections as a political party and should be barred from expressing its ideas supporting armed conflict in public.

Over the weekend, hundreds of people dressed in white took to the streets of Lima’s Miraflores district to mark the 20th anniversary of Guzman’s capture by the security forces.

Saturday’s peace march went down Tarata street, where 20 people died when a car bomb was detonated by the guerrilla group in 1992.

A truth commission appointed by former President Alejandro Toledo blamed the Shining Path for most of the nearly 70,000 deaths the panel ascribed to politically motivated violence during the two decades following the group’s 1980 uprising.

The guerrilla group, according to commission estimates, also caused an estimated $25 billion in economic losses.

The Maoist-inspired Shining Path launched its uprising on May 17, 1980, with an attack on Chuschi, a small town in Ayacucho province.

Guzman, known to his fanatic followers as “President Gonzalo,” was captured with his top lieutenants on Sept. 12, 1992, an event that marked the “defeat” of the insurgency.

The guerrilla leader, who was a professor of philosophy at San Cristobal University before initiating his armed struggle in the Andean city of Ayacucho, once predicted that 1 million Peruvians would probably have to die in the ushering-in of the new state envisioned by Shining Path.

The group became notorious for some of its innovations, such as blowing apart with dynamite the bodies of community service workers its members killed, or hanging stray canines from lampposts as warnings to “capitalist dogs.”

The Shining Path’s remnants operate in the Upper Huallaga Valley and in the VRAEM region, where they are involved in drug trafficking and stage attacks on the security forces.

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President Felipe Calderon: Privilege to Work for Mexico During Its “Dramatic and Difficult Hours”

President Felipe Calderon: Privilege to Work for Mexico During Its “Dramatic and Difficult Hours”

Photo: Felipe Calderon's Last Day as Mexican President

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President Felipe Calderon said at an independence day event over the weekend that it was a privilege to have worked for Mexico during “dramatic and difficult hours,” referring to the wave of drug-related violence that has left more than 50,000 people dead since he took office in late 2006.

“Working for Mexico is a privilege that has no equal and doing so in the dramatic and difficult hours that we have had to live through is an indescribable privilege,” Calderon said during a ceremony on Sunday marking the 202nd anniversary of the start of Mexico’s independence from Spain.

Calderon, who will hand over the presidency to Enrique Peña Nieto in less than three months, has used his recent appearances to bid farewell to the country and tout his administration’s achievements.

“We Mexicans all have a commitment to history and future generations will judge whether we were up to the circumstances that we had to live through,” the president said in his address at the iconic Angel of Independence monument in Mexico City.

“Beyond our challenges and our achievements, there has always been present in our actions an understanding that we must do and decide what is best for Mexico,” Calderon said.

The president gave the “Grito,” the traditional Independence Day rallying cry, for the last time in his six-year term on Saturday night.

Calderon led the traditional ceremony from the balcony of the National Palace before some 100,000 people who gathered in Mexico City’s huge Zocalo plaza.

The ceremony commemorates Father Miguel Hidalgo’s rallying cry early on the morning of Sept. 16, 1810, in the city of Dolores Hidalgo, in the central state of Guanajuato, the birthplace of the independence movement.

“This Sept. 16 we once again take the opportunity to focus on our challenges, on what we want to do for Mexico and on the mark that we as a generation should leave on history,” Calderon, who was accompanied by several of his Cabinet officers, said.

“Mexico needs all of us, let us join forces to continue transforming it into the great nation it is called to be. Let us not forget that the past of our countries is in our hearts, but what is to come is in our hands,” the president said.

Calderon followed up his address at the Angel of Independence by presiding over the traditional military parade in the Zocalo, Mexico City’s main plaza.

The president inspected the troops and then headed to the National Palace, from which he watched nearly 20,000 armed forces members marching past the reviewing stand and showing off some of the equipment being used in the war on drugs.

Vehicles and Black Hawk helicopters provided by the United States under the Merida Initiative, a regional security cooperation pact crafted by the Bush administration in 2007 to help Mexico, Central America, Haiti and the Dominican Republic fight drug trafficking and other forms of transnational crime, were among the military equipment on display.

The Mexico City international airport closed from 10:30 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. on Sunday because of the parade, forcing flights to be rescheduled.

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WTF? - Armadillo Official Mascot for Brazil’s 2014 World Cup Games

WTF? - Armadillo Official Mascot for Brazil’s 2014 World Cup Games

Photo: 2014 World Cup Brazil Games Mascot

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FIFA and Brazil’s 2014 World Cup Organizing Committee have presented the soccer championship’s mascot, an armadillo whose name will be decided by popular vote and which will be used to raise awareness about the importance of ecology and the environment.

Soccer star Ronaldo Nazario de Lima was chosen to present the final design of the mascot on Brazil’s Globo television, FIFA said on its Web site.

The Brazilian striker confessed to feeling “very happy…to be able to welcome such an important member of the 2014 team,” one that will be an “illustrious ambassador” for Brazil “over the next two years.”

The Brazilian said “it will inspire soccer-playing children and young people in Brazil and around the world with the immense passion it feels for soccer and country.”

Brazilian fans will choose the mascot’s name in polling that will continue until mid-November, and in which each person will vote for one of the three names selected by a jury of ex-soccer players like Bebeto and which are “Amijubi,” “Fuleco” and “Zuzeco.”

The mascot, which has as its official anthem “Tatu Bom de Bola,” sung by vocalist Arlindo Cruz, was chosen by FIFA and the organizing committee after comparing 47 entries from six Brazilian agencies.

“It’s very appropriate that the Brazilian three-banded armadillo is an endangered species, because one goal of the World Cup is to use the championship to raise people’s awareness about the importance of ecology and the environment,” FIFA secretary-general Jerome Valcke said.

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Spain’s El Hierro Island Volcano Starts Erupting

Spain’s El Hierro Island Volcano Starts Erupting

Photo: Underwater Volcano on El Hierro Island erupts

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Volcanic activity on Spain’s El Hierro island has resumed far below the Earth’s surface in a similar manner to last July, albeit slightly stronger, the director of the National Geographic Institute, or IGN, in the Canary Islands, Maria Jose Blanco, told Efe on Sunday.

Blanco said that a peak of seismic activity is under way, a continuation of the volcanic process - a shifting of magma many kilometers (miles) under ground - that began in July 2011 which, although the main activity ended at the time with an undersea eruption, that did not mean that the overall activity had come to a definitive conclusion.

The IGN official said that at present it is not expected that the seismic movements that have been registered - which have occurred at depths of some 20 kilometers (about 12.5 miles) - exceed 3.2 on the Richter scale, a fairly low level.

Blanco could not specify how long this new round of activity would last, although she did say that seismic peaks like the current one would, in all likelihood, continue to occur.

Therefore, she said, the IGN is studying the idea of convening the scientific committee of the Civil Protection Plan for Volcanic Risk in the Canaries after this reactivation in the depths of the El Hierro volcano, where over the past three days more than 330 minor seismic movements have been registered.

Officials with the regional government of the Canaries told Efe that experts had verified “an acceleration of released seismic energy accompanied by deformations” in underground structures.

For the present, the largest movement registered so far was the one measured at 3.2 on the Richter scale, which was felt on Saturday for some 13 hours and 15 minutes by the residents of the municipality of El Pinar, according to IGN data.

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MondaySeptember 17, 2012