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FridayAugust 3, 2012

Latino Daily News: Bringing You the Latest Hispanic Current Events and News Stories 24/7

To reflect the dynamic interests of our audience, Latino Daily News is an online daily news source and virtual cultural center for and about Latinos. We offer the latest news headlines, as well as innovative and insightful Hispanic current events stories, photos, videos, and commentaries from a Latino perspective, 24/7.

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OLYMPICS: Mexico Wins First Medals Ever in Archery

OLYMPICS: Mexico Wins First Medals Ever in Archery

Photo: Aida Roman and Mariana Avitia

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Mexico ended its medal drought in Olympic archery here Thursday with a double triumph for Aida Roman and Mariana Avitia, who came away with the silver and bronze, respectively.

South Korea’s Ki Bo-bae beat Roman in the final to take the gold.

The 24-year-old Roman reached the finals after victories over Miki Kanie of Japan, Italy’s Pia Lionetti and teammate Avitia.

“The feeling is incredible,” Roman said. “I have been training my whole life and I have made it. This medal is for me, for my family and for everyone who has supported me. And, of course, for Mexico.”

Mariana Avitia, an 18-year-old Monterrey native, upset South Korean archer Lee Sung-jin in the quarterfinals and went on to defeat Khatuna Lorig of the United States in the bronze-medal match.

“I am very, very happy, this is a very moving moment in the life of an athlete,” Avitia said after winning the bronze.

“To have the support of my family and my coach has been very important for me. Thank you, Mexico. I love you,” she said.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Dominican President Leonel Fernandez Awards Highest Civilian Honor to U.S. DEA Administrator

Dominican President Leonel Fernandez Awards Highest Civilian Honor to U.S. DEA Administrator

Photo: Dominican Republic President Leonel Fernandez

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Dominican Republic President Leonel Fernandez today awarded the Order of Merit to DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart for her effort and commitment to battling global drug trafficking.  The Order of Merit of Duarte, Sanchez, and Mella is the principal order of the Dominican Republic, and is conferred by the President to both civilians and militaries for distinguished services.

Founded in 1931 as the Order of Merit of Juan Pablo Duarte and renamed in 1954, the order is conferred by the President as Head of State for distinguished service to the country. The grade of Commander is normally awarded to recipients of the rank of provincial governors, heads of universities, artists and writers of international reputation.

Upon being bestowed the award at the Presidential Palace, Leonhart affirmed the United States’ commitment in its war against drugs and drug trafficking. 

The award is names after Duarte, Sánchez and Mella who were heroes of the struggle for Dominican independence.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Hispanic Females in the U.S. Have Longest Life Expectancy at 83.8 Years

Hispanic Females in the U.S. Have Longest Life Expectancy at 83.8 Years

Photo: Female Latinas Have Longest Life Expectancy

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Mortality in the United States is best summarized by the age-adjusted death rate—a measure that accounts for changes in the age distribution of the population. In 2010, the age-adjusted death rate for the United States was 746.2 per 100,000 population. 

Based on that statistic non-Hispanic blacks had the highest mortality rate followed by the non-Hispanic white population.  Death rates for all race and ethnic groups have been decreasing since 1950 according to the July, 2012 National Center for Health Statistics.

Hispanic females have the longest life expectancy at 83.8 years followed by non-Hispanic white females at 81.1 years.  Hispanic’s of both sexes have the longest U.S. life expectancy at 81.3 versus 78.7, for all races and origins.

In 2010, the five leading causes of death were: heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, and accidents. The ranking of conditions varies according to demographics such as age, sex, and race.  However, the infant mortality rate reached a record-low level of 6.14 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2010.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Another Stumble for Spain’s King Juan Carlos (VIDEO)

Another Stumble for Spain’s King Juan Carlos (VIDEO)

Photo: Spain's King Juan Carlos Stumbles

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King Juan Carlos of Spain took a nasty spill while reviewing the military troops in Madrid suffering a bump on the nose.

The embarrassing trip-up left the monarch sprawled out in front of the troops he was reviewing while photographers clicked away.  Showing his fighting spirit the 74-year-old monarch returned later in the afternoon for a photo op with the country’s military leaders.

This latest stumble comes after the King’s spill in Africa in April, while on safari.  The incident, though leaving him with a fractured hip, was more damaging to his reputation.  The trip was viewed as poorly timed and insensitive in light of Spain’s severe recession and high unemployment.  He also received a diss from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) when he was removed as the conservation group’s honorary president. 

The picture of the monarch with rifle in hand and a dead elephant as an ornament did not endear him to his country or organizations trying to preserve endangered animals.

Last year, Juan Carlos was also photographed with facial injuries that according to the Telegraph resulted from ‘slamming into a door.’ 

Read more by HS News Staff →

Murders Down 7 Percent in Mexico, Claims Calderon

Murders Down 7 Percent in Mexico, Claims Calderon

Photo: Murders in Mexico

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The number of murders committed in Mexico fell “some 7 percent in the first half of this year,” compared to the same period in 2011, and a downward trend is being seen “for the first time in several years,” President Felipe Calderon said Thursday.

Deaths linked to violence between criminal organizations have fallen “close to 15 percent,” Calderon told the 33rd session of the National Public Safety Council, or CNSP.

“Month after month (in the first half of 2012), we have seen a decrease in homicides with respect to the same month last year,” Calderon said.

Twenty-two of the 37 most dangerous leaders of criminal organizations have been “captured or killed” during the current administration, whose term ends this year, the president said.

These successes are a result of the security policy implemented by the government, Calderon told the CNSP, whose members include state governors, Cabinet members and representatives of civil society.

The change from “a reactive model to a preventive one” was among the most important changes, making it possible to have “a civilian option in security matters,” the president said.

The progress made will eventually allow the army to play “a subsidiary and supplementary” function, a role different than the one it has played since late 2006, when soldiers took the lead in providing security in the areas most plagued by drug-related violence, Calderon said.

Since taking office on Dec. 1, 2006, the security crisis, with criminal organizations getting stronger and public institutions becoming weaker, has been turned around, the president said.

“The challenge today is to consolidate these positive effects beyond governments, situations and parties. I call for us from this national council to continue the process that our generation began in the search for a Mexico of laws, order and security for everyone,” Calderon said.

This is the last National Public Safety Council session that Calderon, whose successor will take office on Dec. 1, will lead.

Enrique Peña Nieto, of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, will be Mexico’s next president if the TEPJF electoral court certifies the results of the July 1 presidential election.

Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the candidate of the leftist Progressive Movement coalition, has challenged the results of the presidential election, alleging that the PRI exceeded campaign spending limits and engaged in vote-buying with funds obtained from illicit sources.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Deported Mexican Returns to U.S. for Custody Battle of Children

Deported Mexican Returns to U.S. for Custody Battle of Children

Photo: Felipe Bautista Montes and his wife

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An immigrant deported to Mexico who is fighting to keep custody of his three children received humanitarian permission to return to the United States to continue his court battle in North Carolina.

Felipe Bautista Montes since Wednesday has been in the western city of Sparta, where on Aug. 10 he must present himself at a hearing before a judge.

Carlos Flores Vizcarra, Mexico’s general consul for the Carolinas, confirmed Thursday to Efe that the Department of Homeland Security authorized Montes to receive permission to stay in the country for 90 days.

The Mexican Consulate hired a lawyer to handle the request that was accepted last week by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

“In the 11 years of my career, I have never heard of a similar action, where the same agency that deported an immigrant now allows him to return,” Flores emphasized to Efe.

Donna Shumate, the attorney for Montes in the custody case, commented on Thursday to Efe that his physical presence in court will mean a “big difference” in the presentation of the arguments that the children should return to Mexico with their father.

“Having Felipe here will (make it) easier to respond to the judge’s questions,” she said.

Also, Shumate said that Montes has already met with his wife Marie and that he is “optimistic” that he will be able to see his children again soon.

The 34-year-old Montes’s nightmare began one morning in October 2010 when he got up to prepare breakfast for his pregnant wife and the couple’s sons, Isaias and Adrian, and get them ready to take them to daycare.

Having lived and worked nine years in Sparta, he was the family’s sole provider, as Marie - a U.S. citizen - suffers from an unspecified disabling mental illness.

Unable to get a driver’s license because he was undocumented, Montes had been arrested several times for driving without a license, but continued to drive so he could work.

When he went to court to pay his fines, two ICE agents were waiting for him.

They handcuffed him and transferred him to a detention center in Georgia, from where he was deported to Mexico on Dec. 3, 2010, as his wife was expecting the couple’s third child.

Soon after Felipe’s deportation, his wife lost custody of their children due to economic difficulties and a decline in her health.

The state Division of Social Services placed the kids with foster families who are now seeking to adopt them.

Montes’s situation is not an isolated case, according to the Applied Research report “Shattered Families,” which shows that more than 5,000 children of deported or detained immigrant parents are currently in foster homes.

From Mexico, Montes expressed his wish to bring the children to live with him and take care of them in the humble house in the northern state of Tamaulipas that he shares with aunts, uncles and cousins.

However, the North Carolina DSS has argued that the children, who are U.S. citizens, would be better off in this country in the custody of other people.

Consul Flores Vizcarra emphasized to Efe that Mexican authorities will continue to support the father and the family and if the judge rules in their favor they will process the passports and travel tickets of the father and the children so they can return to Mexico.

Read more by HS News Staff →

OLYMPICS 2012: Sen. Marco Rubio Introduces Bill to Eliminate Tax on Olympic Medal Winners

OLYMPICS 2012: Sen. Marco Rubio Introduces Bill to Eliminate Tax on Olympic Medal Winners

Photo: Olympic Medals are Taxed, No Says Rubio

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Senator Marco Rubio introduced The Olympic Tax Elimination Act , a bill that would exempt U.S. Olympic medal winners from paying taxes on their hard-earned medals.  Currently, Olympians who win medals also receive honorariums in the form of cash payments of $25,000 for gold, $15,000 for silver and $10,000 for bronze, with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) collecting taxes on these amounts.

Rubio: “We need a fundamental overhaul of our tax code, but we shouldn’t wait any time we have a chance to aggressively fix ridiculous tax laws like this tax on Olympians’ medals and prize money. We can all agree that these Olympians who dedicate their lives to athletic excellence should not be punished when they achieve it.”

According to the Washington Post athletes that win gold medals can face a $8,986 tax bill, silver medal winners a $5,385 tax and bronze winners a $,3502 tax.  Rubio’s bill would exempt the honorariums and the value of the Olympic medal itself. 

Currently the U.S. and China are tied in the Olympic medal count each winning 42 medals thus far.  The U.S. leads in Gold Medal wins with 21 as of Friday afternoon. 

Read more by HS News Staff →

INFOGRAPHIC: Latin America’s Best Cities to Live In

INFOGRAPHIC: Latin America’s Best Cities to Live In

Photo: Hispanically Speaking News

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The ranking system is based on a report by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) using a spatial adjusted livability index.  The EIU ranked 70 cities internationally, Hong Kong ranked the highest and Harare, Zimbabwe ranked the lowest.  The other scores (ie- education) are out of 100.

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LATINO BLOTTER: Pulls Out Pockets to Prove he Has No Drugs, Drops Drugs

LATINO BLOTTER: Pulls Out Pockets to Prove he Has No Drugs, Drops Drugs

Photo: LATINO BLOTTER: Pulls Out Pockets to Prove he Has No Drugs, Drops Drugs

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A not-so-smart alleged drug dealer was recently questioned by police at a bar in Florida, but in trying to prove he had no drugs, he did just the opposite.

Police in Fort Walton Beach had been called to the Racho Alegre bar after getting reports there was a drug dealer on the premises. When they arrived, they found 24-year-old Herminio Hurtado-Resendiz.

Hurtado-Resendiz then voluntarily pulled out his pockets to prove to the officers he was not carrying drugs. However, when he pulled them out, a bag with white powder fell out and on to the ground. Testing revealed it was indeed cocaine and Hurtado-Resendiz was charged with possession of a controlled substance.

He is due in court of August 21.

All we have to say is…

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Prison Companies Making Big Money Off Arrests of Illegal Immigrants

Prison Companies Making Big Money Off Arrests of Illegal Immigrants

Photo: Prison Companies Making Big Money Off Arrests of Illegal Immigrants

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A recent review by the Associated Press found prison companies are seeing large profits from the detention of undocumented immigrants. However, it is the American taxpayers who are paying more than $2 billion a year.

Each year, roughly 400,000 immigrants are detained, with the privately-run prison companies housing many of them.

According to the Associated Press, “In 2011, nearly half the beds in the nation’s civil detention system were in private facilities with little federal oversight, up from just 10 percent a decade ago.”

Important to note is the fact that these companies are also making money from subsidiaries meant to provide health care and transportation for the immigrants in the private prisons being held for federal crimes.

Many of those who pushed for the arrest of undocumented immigrants also made money off the arrests, as they are involved with the private prison companies.

Back in August 2010, we pointed out that while Arizona Governor Jan Brewer and then Republican Senator Russell Pearce were claiming illegal immigrants were pouring into the country and most were perpetrating horrendous crimes, they were actually seeing huge financial donations from private prison companies.

In 2010:

What Governor Brewer and Republican Senator Russell Pearce, principal architect of SB1070, fail to mention is that they have immense financial ties to the private detention and correction services. What this means is, as more arrests are made on federal immigration charges, more money goes into the pockets of those involved with Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), a company which stands to make a profit reaching into the millions if Arizona’s law passes.

CCA, a leading provider of detention and correction services in the country, holds the contract to imprison all federal detainees in the state of Arizona. Pearce’s financial records also show that the political action committees funded by CCA as well as GeoGroup (another detention services company) have donated the maximum amount allowed to his campaign.

CCA also contributed to Prop 100 and SB1070 which set the stage for Brewer’s reelection bid. Interestingly enough, when Phoenix’s CBS affiliate KPHO first reported on the conflict of interest the Brewer campaign pulled all its advertisements from the network.

In the end, Pearce lost the potential reelection, but not for lack of serious financial backing from the private prison system.

Interestingly enough, according to AP‘s research, in the last decade private prison giants CCA, The GEO Group, and Management and Training Corp. have spent more than $45 million total on campaign donations and lobbyists at both the state and federal level.

Of course, the companies insist they are not donating money just in support of candidates whose policies would bring the private prisons money.

A CCA spokesman recently told AP, “As a matter of long-standing corporate policy, CCA does not lobby on issues that would determine the basis for an individual’s detention or incarceration.”

Read more by HS News Staff →

Traffic Stop in Veracruz, MX Turns Up Several Endangered Species

Traffic Stop in Veracruz, MX Turns Up Several Endangered Species

Photo: Traffic Stop in Veracruz, MX Turns Up Several Endangered Species

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Authorities in the Mexican state of Veracruz say they found a number of animals, some of them endangered, in a truck on Tuesday.

ImageSoldiers from Mexico’s Ministry of National Defense were reportedly patrolling the highway between Minatitlan and Agua Dulce when they pulled over a truck in a routine traffic stop. The driver was discovered to be transporting live animals, 478 gallons of gasoline, and 5 gallons of diesel fuel.

Some of the animals found on the truck included pheasants, crocodiles, parrots, turtles, and toucans. Upon closer inspection, it was revealed that some of the animals in the truck were listed as endangered species.

Aside from the animals and the fuel, soldiers also found ocelot skin.The ocelot is a wild cat found in both South and Central America, and has even been known to inhabit the southern most parts of Texas. Famed eccentric artist Salvador Dalí was known to keep an ocelot named Babou as pet, even taking him on cruises.

The truck driver was arrested and the animals and fuel were turned over to federal officials.

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Costa Rica’s ‘Finca Bellavista’ is Tree Lover’s Paradise (PHOTOS & VIDEO)

Costa Rica’s ‘Finca Bellavista’ is Tree Lover’s Paradise (PHOTOS & VIDEO)

Photo: Costa Rica's 'Finca Bellavista' is Tree Lover's Paradise

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A trip to Costa Rica and a Colorado couple’s dream of owning land and saving beautiful land from from deforestation has resulted in something absolutely incredible.

In 2006, Matt Hogan went on a surfing trip in Costa Rica with some friend. He would later call his wife Erica to discuss buying a getaway home. The two then met up on the country’s Southern Zone and began looking for a place, maybe a fixer-upper surf shack type of place where they could simply relax and escape Colorado’s ‘mud-season.’

In their search they came cross a 100-acre section of wild rainforest that was being sold as a potential harvesting site. Noticing the beauty and especially the trees of the area, the Hogans decided to do something completely different and save the land for deforestation.

In the years since finding and purchasing the land, which now includes an additional 500 acres, the Hogans have transformed beautiful trees into stunning tree houses that make up a community called Finca Bellavista, where zip lines connect neighbors, backyards provide residents with food, and monkeys, frogs, and countless birds are guests.


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STUDY:  Few Latinos Obtain Phd’s in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

STUDY:  Few Latinos Obtain Phd’s in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

Photo: Study on Latinos in Science and Technology

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A study by Excelencia! In Education (Excelencia) identifies the top institutions graduating Latinos at each academic level from certificates to doctoral degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) for 2009-10.  The study also includes insight on Latinos pursuing STEM degrees in that timeframe.

The study found that Latinos earn a small percentage (8%) of all certificates and degrees in STEM, but those Latinos in STEM studies were more likely to pursue a study of science followed by engineering.

Though the study analyzed many academic levels of STEM studies, Latino’s degree attainment (60%) was concentrated at the bachelor level.  From 2009-10:  28 doctoral degrees in science, 2 in computer science, 12 in engineering and 5 in math were given to Latinos at the top degree earning institutions for Latinos.

Forty-seven percent of all STEM degrees received by Latinos were given out at 25 institutions.  For more information and a copy of the complete study click here.

Excelencia accelerates higher education success for Latino students by providing data-driven analysis of the educational status of Latinos, and by promoting education policies and institutional practices that support their academic achievement.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Nation’s July Unemployment Creeps Up To 8.3%, While the Hispanic Rate Decreases to 10.3%

Nation’s July Unemployment Creeps Up To 8.3%, While the Hispanic Rate Decreases to 10.3%

Photo: July Unemployment Rate, Hispanic Unemployment Rate

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The nation’s July unemployment rate creeped up to 8.3% from the June rate of 8.2%.  New jobs created came in at 163,000 for the month with most of the gains coming from the business services sector. 

The unemployment rate ticked up because there were more people who said they were not working when surveyed in July.

The Hispanic unemployment rate showed a decline to 10.3% in July from 11% in June.  The jobless rate among African-Americans also decreased from 14.4% to 14.1% in July.  Teenagers continue to have the highest unemployment rate by demographic with the July rate at 23.8%.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Mexican Venture Fund to Support Education, Financial and Retail Services

Mexican Venture Fund to Support Education, Financial and Retail Services

Photo: Mexico Development Fund to help smal businesses

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The Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF) approved a $5 million equity investment in Mexico Development Fund I (MDF-I), a venture capital fund that will provide financing, as well as strategic and operational advice to small and medium-sized companies in Mexico. The Fund will be operated by PC Capital Partners, a Mexican firm with extensive experience in financing, management consulting and private equity.

MDF-I will focus on companies that provide education, financial and retail services, or produce eco-friendly products targeted at a growing and young local middle class. These companies should have a proven business concept, requiring capital to expand operations or develop new markets and products.

The investments made by MDF-I are expected to have economic and social benefits in terms of fostering entrepreneurship, creating direct and indirect employment, promoting sustainable business models and expanding education opportunities to broader populations.

MIF investment in the Fund will play a catalytic role in supporting the development of the local venture capital industry, building local management capabilities, demonstrating the financial viability of these vehicles, and mobilizing critical investors and stakeholders.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Truthout Reports Exploitation of Detained Immigrants

Truthout Reports Exploitation of Detained Immigrants

Photo: Detained immigrants

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Undocumented immigrants are not allowed to work legally in the United States, but they can do so for $1 a day in the privately run detention centers where they await deportation, according to a report by Truthout.

Jacqueline Stevens, a professor at Northwestern University who sought figures on the “voluntary” work program through a Freedom of Information Act request, calls the existence of these programs “shameful and ironic” and says that the federal government should immediately close any workplace that operates under those conditions.

“On the one hand, they say we must deport these people because they are taking away the jobs of Americans, but on the other hand the employment of the people who are detained under conditions of near slavery is being subsidized,” she told Efe.

Although Stevens acknowledges that being in prison means that a person loses their right to receive the minimum wage, she warns that the concept should not be applied to immigrants detained awaiting the clarification of the immigration situation.

“People who are being detained only while they await an immigration court audience and not for punitive reasons are being forced to work for a dollar a day and this not only seems to violate the minimum wage laws, but also the 13th Amendment against slavery,” she said.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement insists that the Voluntary Work Program, “under conditions of confinement, does not constitute employment and is done by detainees on a voluntary basis for a small stipend.”

Among the immigrant detention centers named by the professor are the El Centro Service Processing Center in El Centro, California; Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Georgia and Varick Detention Center in New York City.

Azadeh Shashahani, the director of the National Security and Immigrant Rights Project at the ACLU of Georgia, says that the voluntary work programs expose detainees to possible exploitation.

“These programs add to the exploitation of the detained immigrants who are already in a vulnerable situation,” Shashahani told Efe.

The ACLU official, who on many occasions has denounced the treatment received by undocumented detainees in the detention centers in Georgia, said that these programs are one more way for the corporations who administer the centers to obtain an economic benefit from the detainees.

According to the ACLU report “Prisoners of Profit,” food at the detention centers is inadequate and many of the detainees do not have the means to buy products like chocolates, cookies or telephone cards that are available at the prison store.

In need of money, the detainees find themselves forced to work at a fraction of the minimum wage, the ACLU found.

Shashahani said that the findings of the report show the need for ICE to take the necessary measures to stop the exploitation of detainees.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Mine Pollution Harming Health of Honduran Community

Mine Pollution Harming Health of Honduran Community

Photo: Mine Pollution Harming Health of Honduran Community

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Pollution of water sources from gold mining activity has harmed the health of most of the residents of a central Honduran valley, where skin and eye ailments and even newborn deaths are frequent, local environmental activists say.

“Eighty of every 100 inhabitants suffer skin or eye problems due to the pollution of water sources” in the Siria Valley, east of Tegucigalpa, Juan Almendares, coordinator of the Mother Earth Movement, said Wednesday, attributing the situation to mining activity in the area through 2008.

In addition to those ailments, local residents “suffer nervous system problems, hair loss, miscarriages, infertility, premature deliveries, newborn deaths and poisoning,” Almendares, former president of the National Autonomous University of Honduras, added.

Canadian gold producer Goldcorp operated in the Siria Valley between 2000 and 2008, during which time it caused “irreversible” damage to water sources,” Roger Escobar, vice president of the Siria Valley environmental committee, told Efe.

The nearly 40,000 inhabitants of villages in the valley have been forced to use polluted water and that has damaged their health, according to the activist, who said the government is chiefly responsible because it gave the green light for the mining projects.

According to Almendares, women have been “the most affected” by the environmental damage in the Siria Valley because they have “the most contact with the polluted water.”

The Honduran Congress is currently debating a draft bill aimed at promoting mining while ensuring environmental protection.

Almendares has urged lawmakers to vote down the bill, saying it would favor “only the mining companies, open-pit production,” and would allow concessions to be awarded “in protected areas” of Honduras.

“What we want is for the mining companies to leave the country,” Almendares said, adding that the mining industry accounts for less than 2 percent of Honduras’ gross domestic product.

Read more by HS News Staff →

No More Happy in ‘Happy Meals’ in Chile – Ban on Toys in Fast Food Being Enforced

No More Happy in ‘Happy Meals’ in Chile – Ban on Toys in Fast Food Being Enforced

Photo: Happy Meal Toys Ban in Chile

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Chile’s Health ministry has received a formal complaint against fast food companies operating in the country that continue to give out toys and give-aways in children’s meals.

The June 7, 2012 ban on the toys was an effort to reduce obesity rates amongst the country’s youngsters, yet officials say it is not being honored.  According to the Washington Post, Senator Giudo Girardi, who brought the issue to the attention of the health ministry said “These businesses know that this food damages the health of children and they know that the law is in effect. They’re using fraudulent and abusive means.”

If this South American’s countrys health ministry finds fast food providers like McDonald’s and Burger King guilty of violating the ban they face fines

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Telefonica to Invest $980 M to Expand Presence, Services in Argentina

Telefonica to Invest $980 M to Expand Presence, Services in Argentina

Photo: Telefonica of Argentina

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Spanish telecoms group Telefonica said Wednesday it will invest 4.5 billion pesos ($980.3 million) this year in Argentina, focusing those expenditures on network deployment, expansion of its subscriber base and the launch of new digital services.

“This investment is aimed at contributing to the growth of the different economic sectors, understanding that communications are vital to the country’s competitiveness,” the president of Telefonica’s Argentine unit, Luis Blasco Bosqued, said in a statement.

The company says it expects to reach 5 million fixed broadband, mobile Internet and data transmission subscribers by year’s end.

The investment plan for this year calls for developing new services, increasing broadband capacity, expanding its mobile network and deploying its fiber-optic network to offices of large corporate customers and small businesses.

Telefonica has a total of 23 million subscribers in Argentina, including 17 million mobile telephone customers and some 4 million broadband users.

The company, which has roughly 20,000 direct employees in Argentina, invested some 2.6 billion pesos ($566.4 million) in the South American country last year.

Read more by HS News Staff →



FridayAugust 3, 2012