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SundaySeptember 25, 2011

Latino Daily News: Bringing You the Latest Hispanic Current Events and News Stories 24/7

To reflect the dynamic interests of our audience, Latino Daily News is an online daily news source and virtual cultural center for and about Latinos. We offer the latest news headlines, as well as innovative and insightful Hispanic current events stories, photos, videos, and commentaries from a Latino perspective, 24/7.

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WNBA Legends’ Olympia Scott & Sue Wicks Travel to Dominican Republic as Sports Diplomats

WNBA Legends’ Olympia Scott & Sue Wicks Travel to Dominican Republic as Sports Diplomats

Photo: WNBA Sports

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Using sports as a means to empower young people worldwide, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) announced today that WNBA legends Olympia Scott and Sue Wicks will travel to Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic as sports envoys.

Sports diplomacy builds on Secretary Clinton’s vision of “smart power” diplomacy. It embraces the use of a full range of diplomatic tools, including sports, to bring people together for greater understanding.

Starting tomorrow through October 1, Scott and Wicks will lead basketball clinics and teambuilding exercises for young women ages 12-17 from underserved communities. This trip builds on the Department’s continued efforts to empower women and girls through sports. It follows the Women’s World Cup Initiative that brought 16 young women to the United States for an international sports exchange.

In addition, the sports diplomats will visit the Binational Center in Santo Domingo to meet with parents and teachers. The Binational Center provides educational programs, such as the teaching of English, to promote knowledge and mutual understanding between the people of the Dominican Republic and the United States.

Sports envoys are current and retired professional athletes and coaches that travel overseas to conduct drills and team building activities, as well as engage youth in a dialogue on the importance of education, positive health practices and respect for diversity.

SportsUnited is the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs’ leading sports exchange program at the U.S. Department of State. Athletes and coaches from a range of sports are chosen to conduct clinics, visit schools, and engage with youth overseas in a dialogue on the importance of an education, positive health practices, and respect for diversity.

Since 2003, SportsUnited has brought more than 600 athletes from 44 countries to the U.S. to participate in Sport Visitor programs. Since 2005, SportsUnited has sent more than 100 U.S. athletes to 40 countries to participate in Sport Envoy programs.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Victor Cruz NFL’s Newest Darling at Least for This Week

Victor Cruz NFL’s Newest Darling at Least for This Week

Photo: Wow Victor Cruz Rides to Victory

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How did the San San Francisco Giant’s most unlikely game hero, Victor Cruz, become this week’s NFL darling?  The 29-16 Sunday win for the Giants v Eagles made everyone notice this Puerto Rican wide receiver that was an undrafted free agent not that long ago and just signed in the off season.

Cruz caught his first touchdown in a regular season game but also went on to catch another later in the game.  One of the passes, a fourth quarter play, was a catching-fight between Cruz and Eagles super-star Nnamdi Asomugha who is working on a $60 million dollar contract to Cruz’ barely $1 million contract.  Cruz wasn’t even suppose to play but two injured Giant receivers forced the coach to put him in.

Cruz put the Giants on the board, 14-0, with a touch down pass from quarterback Eli Manning taking the team to a first-quarter lead.  Then later in the game the Giants were trailing 16-14 when Manning threw another pass to Cruz that was sandwiched between a lot of Eagle talent Jarrad Page and Asomugha and he broke through for a touchdown in the fourth quarter.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Latin American Economies Doing Well Inspite of Global Economic Problems Say Economic Ministers

Latin American Economies Doing Well Inspite of Global Economic Problems Say Economic Ministers

Photo: Latin American Economies Doing Well

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Latin America and the Caribbean continue to weather relatively well the problems currently afflicting the global economy, Inter-American Development Bank President Luis Alberto Moreno said today at a meeting of central bankers and finance ministers.

Speaking to members of the Group of 30, Moreno said: “Indeed for many countries, the external environment has been relatively positive, and the region has made significant and fundamental advances. Still, the region is in a position to advance even further.”

Progress, however, has been uneven. Countries that are net exporters of commodities to emerging markets or are capable of attracting foreign investment have outpaced their regional peers, Moreno noted.

Notwithstanding their current performance, Latin American and Caribbean governments need policies to offset risks building up in the global economy. Among the most pressing issues, Moreno listed preventing financial contagion in their banking systems, mitigating the effects of declining commodity prices, containing domestic inflationary pressures and addressing structural problems often overlooked due to short-term concerns.

Moreno made his remarks at a meeting of the Group of 30, which brought together central bankers, finance ministers, international financial institution leaders to discuss the global economic and financial outlook.

The event, held on the sidelines of the fall meeting of the Boards of Governors of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, was led by the G30’s chairman, former Bank of Israel Governor Jacob A. Frenkel, and IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno.

In the closing panel, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde, World Bank President Robert Zoellick and Moreno offered comments from the perspective of the Washington-based multilateral financial institutions.

This is the third time the IDB has hosted a G30 meeting. Over the past 30 years the G30 has produced more than 80 occasional papers and 25 special reports. It has also held 65 plenary meetings and a number of international banking seminars.

Read more by HS News Staff →

National Awareness Campaign Continues to Build Support for Creation of American Latino Museum

National Awareness Campaign Continues to Build Support for Creation of American Latino Museum

Photo: American Latino Museum Continues to Garner Support

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With a series of regional awareness and fundraising events successfully hosted in the key cities of New York, Los Angeles, Washington, DC and Miami, the nonprofit organization at the heart of the movement, to build an American Latino Museum, Friends of the American Latino Museum (FRIENDS), has made significant progress in growing its base of community and fundraising support. 

These events mark the beginning of a national campaign led by the FRIENDS to inform the nation about the value of the museum and further consolidate the base of community support for an American Latino Museum that will highlight the contributions made by Latino leaders, pioneers and communities to the American way of life.

With each new event, attendance numbers continued to rise as interest from the community spread and multiplied.  Jonathan Yorba, Chair of the FRIENDS, praised the national campaign, stating, “After visiting these key markets, it is evident that the American Latino Museum is strongly desired by Americans from coast to coast.  We are happy to provide museum supporters with a venue, through our regional events, and a vehicle, through our national campaign and the FRIENDS organization as a whole, to discuss, come together as a community, and learn more about the movement to build an American Latino Museum.”

Henry Muñoz, Chair of the National Museum of the American Latino Commission (NMAL), has made it a priority to attend several of the regional events, outlining for attendees the Commission’s Final Report “To Illuminate the Story for All,” which was researched, authored and presented to the President and Congress on Cinco De Mayo of this year. This report was completed almost a year before its original deadline.

More than 140 leaders contributed to the Friends organization and attended the reception at Miami’s historic Freedom Tower, and NMAL Commission Vice Chairman Emilio Estefan’s support and presence at the event was invaluable.  We are very pleased with the response and publicity generated and hope that Congress will soon authorize the creation of the museum.”

Representatives from the nonprofit, corporate and public sectors have attended the FRIENDS’ four regional events.  These new supporters and others will be added to the organization’s ever-growing network, which already boasts over 60,000 loyal Facebook followers and a database of over 100,000 supporters.

Following the most recent event in Miami, the FRIENDS’ national fundraising and awareness campaign will continue, with events being planned in Chicago, Dallas, and Las Vegas.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Tecate Beer Bust in Los Angeles Gets 3 Teens in A Lot of Trouble

Tecate Beer Bust in Los Angeles Gets 3 Teens in A Lot of Trouble

Photo: Tecate Beer Bust in Covina California

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This week in odd news has a Tecate beer bust getting three local California teens in a lot of legal hot water.  It all started when three Covina 19-year-olds decided they needed a 30-pack of Tecate beer no matter what.

Two of the teens entered the Baja Ranch Market on Wednesday in the afternoon and run out with the 30-pack but were chased by very dedicated employees.  One teen ran was caught by the employees right away.

The other teen got into the get away car driven by the third Tecate-loving teenager.  But one of those loyal employees leaped onto the hood of the car but was eventually thrown off when the teenagers crashed the car.  Then the two teens decided to make a run for it right through the neighboring car wash.

One made a successful get away and the other washed himself in the car wash while police patiently waited for him on the other side.  The third teen that got away eventually turned himself in.

Now, Andy Huynh, Nicholas Kalscheuer and Nicholas Fiumetto are all facing charges or robbery (30-pack of Tecate), assault with a deadly weapon (the car flinging the employee of the hood) and resisting arrest (hiding in the car wash).  They sit in jail in lieu of $50,000 bail all for a $16.99, 30-pack of Tecate – not worth it we say and stupid – o for sure.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Dominican-American Francisco Nunez Wins MacArthur Genius Award

Dominican-American Francisco Nunez Wins MacArthur Genius Award

Photo: Franciso Nunez Wins MacArthur Genius Award

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Dominican-American Francisco Nunez, a choral conductor and composer who has made a difference to the lives of so many inner-city children in New York City, has been awarded the 2011 Genius Award by the MacArthur Foundation. The award comes with a prize of US$500,000 that the winner can spend as he or she pleases. The funds will be received over a five year period, and Nunez has already announced they will help add more singers to his musical program.

Nunez founded the Young People’s Chorus of New York City (YPC) in 1988. This year MacArthur Foundation recognized his work of bringing young voices from inner city to elite schools to sing new music of the highest quality.

“Melding this vision with expertise, passion, and entrepreneurship, Nunez has elevated the youth chorus to the ranks of serious contemporary music, commissioning and performing some of the most challenging works for youth choirs,” highlights the Foundation.

Today, with over one thousand young people in five after-school choruses and thirteen choruses in its Satellite School Program in inner-city public schools, Nunez’s YPC exposes young singers to an unmatched variety of music and music makers. YPC now tours throughout the United States and internationally, presents concerts to focus the attention of today’s composers on the important instrument that is a child’s voice, and engages in partnerships with dance companies, performing ensembles, radio stations, jazz artists, and leading American music publishers.

YPC is the first children’s choir in this country to be an official radio choir, heard regularly in New York City, and has commissioned more than fifty pieces of music from today’s most respected contemporary composers through its ‘Transient Glory’ series of concerts, CDs, and publications. Nunez has signaled broadly not only that youth choirs have the capacity to transform lives but that they can also expand artistic boundaries and hold a special place in musical achievement.

YPC is currently the resident chorus at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall and at WNYC, New York Public Radio. Nunez also leads the University Glee Club of New York City and is active as a composer and as a guest conductor of orchestras, children’s choirs and festivals worldwide.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Honduras to Benefit from $21 Million Aid to Cut Poverty in Rural Areas

Honduras to Benefit from $21 Million Aid to Cut Poverty in Rural Areas

Photo: Honduras to Invest $21M in Rural Areas

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Small producers in rural areas of Honduras will be the main beneficiaries of a new United Nations-backed project that will invest $21 million to combat poverty in the north of the country.

The project, signed this week by the Honduran Government and the UN International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), aims to facilitate market access for small producers and establish relationships with the private sector to ensure its profitability.

“The Northern Horizons Project is intended to boost competitiveness, income, and food security for small producers in 27 municipalities with high concentrations of rural poverty in the departments of Atlántida, Cortés, and Santa Bárbara,” said Enrique Murguia, coordinator of IFAD projects in Central America.

“The project will benefit about 24,000 households, with 12,000 of them receiving technical assistance, venture capital and financial services.”

The six-year project will be implemented by the Department of Agriculture and Livestock and almost half of the investment will be in the form of a highly concessional loan, noted IFAD in a news release. The Central American Bank for Economic Integration will provide further support in the form of co-financing and the balance will come from national and local contributions.

IFAD has been supporting Honduras since 1979, and has provided approximately $120 million in loans through various projects.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Hispanics in Higher Ed Inspired by the Words & Story of Rachel Moran, Dean of UCLA Law School

Hispanics in Higher Ed Inspired by the Words & Story of Rachel Moran, Dean of UCLA Law School

Photo: Rachel Moran, 1st Latina Dean of Top Law School, UCLA Law

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When Rachel F. Moran was in elementary school she overheard a teacher say, “Such a bright girl. Too bad there’s no future for her.” Even then she realized that her educational prognosis was wrapped up in perceptions of her Mexican ancestry. Moran, now Dean of the UCLA School of Law, has overcome many obstacles on her road to success. She details these, and the importance of connecting with mentors, in the just published 2011 Tomás Rivera Lecture.

Moran was the keynote speaker at the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) annual conference earlier this year. Her address at the conference is reprinted for the annual Tomás Rivera Lecture. The lecture series began in 1985, and is named in honor of the late Dr. Rivera, professor, scholar, poet and former president of the University of California, Riverside. Rivera also served on the board of Educational Testing Service (ETS). This is the third year that AAHHE and ETS have collaborated together to publish the annual lecture.

Moran was named dean of the law school in June of 2010, she becoming the first Latina dean of a top-ranked law school.  She has an undergraduate degree from Stanford and her law degree from Yale, joining the Berkeley law faculty in 1983. From 1993-1996 she served as chair of the Chicano/Latino Policy project for the school.

From her elementary teacher, Mrs. Lola Clevenger, who saw the potential in young Rachel, to Dr. Edmund Deaton, director of a college summer program in mathematics, who helped her gain admission to Stanford University, Moran layers personal insights with the latest research and expert opinion on the pressing issues affecting educational opportunity for Hispanic Americans.

“Today, Latinos’ educational success continues to depend on early intervention, high-quality teachers, and systems of mentoring and support,” Moran says. “According to a study of a universal preschool program in Oklahoma, Latinos benefitted more than any other group from access to this early enrichment experience. For the effects to endure, however, it is key that preschool lead to a strong program of elementary and then secondary education.”

Moran details that while the Latino population is the fastest growing in the United States, it continues to lag in educational attainment. Between 1987 and 2007, the number of Latino students in public schools doubled from 11 percent to 21 percent, and the Census Bureau predicts that by 2021, one in four pupils will be Latino. In certain states the numbers are even larger. Yet many states have disinvested in the education of Latinos. This group is, by one measure, the most segregated student body in America, and there are fewer avenues for parents to participate in educational reform at the school level.

While acknowledging these and other issues, Moran told her academic colleagues, “There is much than can be done at an individual and collective level. As individuals and members of organizations, we need to publicize these issues through the outlets available to us. As leading academics, you have many ways to make your voices heard. But we also need to reach beyond the academy to raise awareness among members of the general public.”

“Each of you can be an ambassador for improving educational attainment among Latinos. You can talk to people you know,” she continued. “You can participate in organizations that address these concerns, and you can write op–eds and blogs on the topic.”

Read more by HS News Staff →

White House to Host First-Ever Hispanic-Focused Online Roundtable

White House to Host First-Ever Hispanic-Focused Online Roundtable

Photo: White House Hosting First-Ever Hispanic Focused Online Roundtable

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Next week President Obama and the White House will host the first-ever Hispanic-focused online roundtable in partnership with Yahoo! media that will be live streamed.  The event is slated for Wednesday, September 28 and well be webcasted from the White House.  The roundtable will be moderated by Jose Siade, editor-in-chief for Yahoo U.S. Hispanics and Latin America. 

This online format according to Yahoo will ‘give people the opportunity to submit questions to the president on the issues that are important to them.’  The roundtable is expected to focus on issues such as the economy, education, immigration and health care.  Yahoo! will moderate the session and ask questions that have been submitted from Yahoo! users.  AOL Latino/HuffPost Latino Voices and MSN Latino will also participate in the roundtable.

People can submit their questions to the President until tomorrow Monday, September 26 at 6pm EDT.  Click here to submit your question. 

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Another Murder Victim by Narcos in Mexico Linked to Use of Social Media

Another Murder Victim by Narcos in Mexico Linked to Use of Social Media

Photo: Nuevo Laredo Police on Patrol

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The decapitation murder of Marisol Macias Castañeda is being linked to her web postings on a social network in Mexico making it the third such killing.

Castañeda is believed to have been killed by the vicious Zeta drug cartel for her postings on a popular social network ‘Nuevo Laredo en Vivo’ or Nuevo Laredo Live.  The network is used as a tip hotline for Mexican authorities on the goings on of cartels.  Tipsters like Castañeda would provide police with tips on where possible drug drops of would be or provide names of cartel members and where they might be hiding out in this border region close to Texas.

Her body was found on the side of a road with her head prominently placed on a nearby stone with a message attached.  The message translated to English read: 

Nuevo Laredo en Vivo and social networking sites, I’m The Laredo Girl, and I’m here because of my reports, and yours,” the message read. “For those who don’t want to believe, this happened to me because of my actions, for believing in the army and the navy. Thank you for your attention, respectfully, Laredo Girl…ZZZZ.”

Castañeda’s log in name to the social network was indeed ‘La Nena de Laredo’ or Laredo Girl.  It is not known how the Zetas, who are believed to be the killers, found out who she was or what kind of postings she made to enraged them.

Castañeda worked at a local border newspaper, Nuevo Laredo, but she held an administrative position there and did not cover the cartels and narco killings that dominant in the region.

Read more by HS News Staff →



SundaySeptember 25, 2011