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WednesdayJune 15, 2011

Latino Daily News: Bringing You the Latest Hispanic Current Events and News Stories 24/7

To reflect the dynamic interests of our audience, Latino Daily News is an online daily news source and virtual cultural center for and about Latinos. We offer the latest news headlines, as well as innovative and insightful Hispanic current events stories, photos, videos, and commentaries from a Latino perspective, 24/7.

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EXTREME TRAFFICKING:  Seizure of Illegal Iguana Meat at U.S.-Mexico Border

EXTREME TRAFFICKING:  Seizure of Illegal Iguana Meat at U.S.-Mexico Border

Photo: Illegal Iguana Meat Found

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Otay Mesa passenger port of entry last week found 159 pounds of concealed iguana meat hidden in coolers underneath fish.

At about 3:30 p.m. on June 7, a 37-year-old male U.S. citizen arrived at vehicle processing at the Otay Mesa passenger port of entry. He declared bringing fish from Mexico with him, and the CBP officer referred him aside for further inspection.

As part of their inspection, CBP officers examined three large coolers. Inside the coolers, CBP officers found fish meat on top, with iguana meat hidden underneath, concealed under the fish.

CBP officers contacted U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents, who responded to the border crossing and charged the man with criminal activity.

CBP officers seized a total of 159 pounds of iguana meat, which was turned over to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Texas Passes Anti-Sanctuary Cities Bill - One Senator Saying, “This is a Sad Day”

Texas Passes Anti-Sanctuary Cities Bill - One Senator Saying, “This is a Sad Day”

Photo: Texas state capital

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Wednesday, the Texas Senate voted against a bill that would have allowed cities to decide whether or not they want to be so-called “Sanctuary Cities” and not require local law enforcement to enforce federal immigration laws.

“This is not about political parties, nor is it about race or hate or fear-mongering,” Senate Bill 9’s sponsor, Sen. Tommy Williams, R-Woodlands said.

The bill was passed 19-12 along party lines despite Texas police standing against the bill, and despite the chamber’s Hispanic members’ warnings that the passing of the bill will make Texas “an unwelcoming place.”

The dean of the Senate, Sen. Steve Whitmire (D-Houston) asked Hispanic senators to stand, and said, “Look at these members of the Senate. This legislation to will force them to prove that they are U.S. citizens. Members, we can do better. This is a sad day.”

Former Marine, and current Sen. Carlos Uresti, (D-San Antoniotold his story of facing bigotry while he was growing up, and he warned that the bill would lead to discrimination against “anyone who looks like me.”

“I shouldn’t have to prove my citizenship because my skin is a little darker than yours. This bill is hurtful, it’s ignorant and it’s offensive.”

Read more at Miami Herald →

Police Stings in Mexico Far, FAR Less Successful Than Scorpion Stings

Police Stings in Mexico Far, FAR Less Successful Than Scorpion Stings

Photo: Scorpions in Mexico

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In the five and a half months of 2011, close to one hundred thousand people have been stung by scorpions in México!

From January first to date, scorpions in the state of Jalisco alone have stung almost 20,000 people; Guerrero, comes second with 15,769 and Morelos, 13,123.

With numbers like that, is no wonder that México’s Bioclon Institute, is among the world leading anti-venom treatment makers, for scorpion stings. The institute currently distributes 700,000 anti-venom units, through Mexican pharmaceutical Silanes, and some half a million units through the Health Department.

Furthermore,  50,000 units of anti-venoms developed in México are also available in Central and South América and 10,000 in the U.S. and Australia, exclusively for zoos.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Human Rights Watch Shows Immigrant Detainees Moved Repeatedly Away from Family and Lawyers

Human Rights Watch Shows Immigrant Detainees Moved Repeatedly Away from Family and Lawyers

Photo: Immigrant Detainees Repeatedly Moved

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Detained immigrants facing deportation in the United States are being transferred, often repeatedly, to remote detention centers by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Human Rights Watch said today in a report analyzing 12 years of data.

The 37-page report, “A Costly Move: Far and Frequent Transfers Impede Hearings for Immigrant Detainees in the United States,” says transfers separate detained immigrants, including legal permanent residents, refugees, and undocumented people, from the attorneys, witnesses, and evidence they need to defend against deportation. That can violate their right to fair treatment in court, slow down asylum or deportation proceedings, and extend their time in detention, Human Rights Watch said.

“Transfers don’t just move people, they push aside their rights,” said Alison Parker, US program director and author of the report. “They can prevent immigrants, like those lawfully here or in need of asylum from persecution, from having an attorney or defending their right to remain in the United States.”

Read more at Human Rights Watch →

Bad News for Charlie, Good News for Penelope

Bad News for Charlie, Good News for Penelope

Photo: Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz in "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides"

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A judge has ruled that Charlie Sheen’s $100 million lawsuit against his former Warner Bros. bosses will not go to trial, and will instead have to be decided behind closed doors.

The once highest paid actor on television for his role on CBS’s “Two and a Half Men”, Sheen’ erratic behavior, and pointed insults at Chuck Lorre, the show’s creator.

In completely unrelated Hollywood new:

Penelope Cruz and Johnny Depp’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides” has become Disney’s biggest international hit in history, closing in on the $1 billion gross earnings mark.

Since its May 20 release, On Stranger Tides has raked in more than $900 million worldwide, making it the fourth biggest earner of all time at the foreign box office. It is only behind Avatar ($2 billion), Titanic ($1.2 billion) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King ($742.1 million) – which it is likely to surpass.

On Stranger Tides is on track to become the “Pirates” franchise’s top-grossing film ever. The second movie, “Dead Man’s Chest” took home $1.066 billion worldwide.

What is impressive about this fourth movie is that it has not been a mega-hit in the U.S.. In fact, it has made the bulk of its money ($660 million) outside of the country.

A number of experts are expecting On Stranger Tides will hit the $1 billion (global) mark, as it already the top grossing movie of 2011.

Read more at The Wrap →

U.S. History Scores Increase at Grade 8 but Not at Grades 4 and 12, Minorities See Greatest Progress

U.S. History Scores Increase at Grade 8 but Not at Grades 4 and 12, Minorities See Greatest Progress

Photo: Minorities Show Improvement Since 1994.

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Most Subgroups and Low Performers Show Greatest Improvement Since 1994

Eighth-graders earned the highest NAEP U.S. history scores to date. Still, only 17 percent scored at or above the Proficient level. In fact, on the seemingly easy question shown here [below, right], only 32 percent of all eighth-grade students who took the assessment provided a complete response. Among students who scored at the Proficient level, however, 72 percent answered the question correctly.

Performance on the U.S. History 2010 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) at Grades 4, 8, and 12 has shown some overall improvement since 1994. However, the only progress since 2006 was at grade eight, with significant improvement of Black and Hispanic eighth grade scores over these years. Performance by fourth and twelfth graders remained unchanged compared to 2006.

The NAEP scores of lower-performing fourth graders have increased since 1994, according to the U.S. History 2010 assessment. The report, released today, showed some of the greatest gains by fourth graders since 1994 were among the historically lowest-performing groups. In the fourth-grade, there was a 22-point increase from 1994 to 2010 in the scores for students ranking in the bottom 10th percentile of performance. In the eighth-grade, students whose scores ranked in the 10th, 25th and 50th percentiles were higher than in 2006. Meanwhile, performance of twelfth-graders was only 2 points higher than in 1994, and there was no significant change in scores from 2006 in any of the five percentiles or racial/ethnic groups. In 2010, over half (55 percent) of high school seniors performed below the Basic achievement level.

“We are encouraged by the progress of our fourth and eighth graders, particularly by the gains being made by students who traditionally have been among the lowest performers,” said David P. Driscoll, chair of the National Assessment Governing Board, which sets policy for NAEP. “We need to bring even more of these students up to the Proficient level, and we want to see more progress overall by our twelfth graders, who will soon be active citizens.”

Broken down by racial and ethnic groups, Blacks and Hispanics in the fourth grade made larger gains (22 points and 23 points, respectively) from 1994 to 2010 than their White counterparts. And in the eighth grade, the increases posted by Black and Hispanic students since 2006 helped them narrow the gaps with their White peers.

Compared to 1994, average scores in 2010 for males were higher at all three grade levels, and scores for female students increased at grades 4 and 8. Males outperformed females in 2010 in grades 8 and 12. Although there was no significant difference in scores between males and females at grade 4 in 2010, the scores of male students were higher than in 2006.

NAEP results are reported as average scores on a 0 to 500 scale and as percentages of students scoring at or above three achievement levels: Basic, denoting partial mastery of the knowledge and skills fundamental for proficient work; Proficient, representing solid academic performance and competency over challenging subject matter; and Advanced, representing superior performance. The scores can be compared to those from 1994, 2001 and 2006 to show how students’ knowledge and skills have progressed.

The history assessment, a mix of multiple choice and constructed-response questions, was administered by the National Center for Education Statistics to nationally representative samples of public and private school students, including 7,000 fourth graders, 11,800 eighth graders and 12,400 twelfth graders.

Questions were designed to measure students’ knowledge and analytical skills in U.S. history in the context of four historical themes: democracy, including basic principles and core values developed from the American Revolution through the present; culture, focusing on how different racial, ethnic and religious groups interacted and the traditions that resulted; technology, focusing on the transformation of America’s economy from rural frontier to industrial superpower and its impact on society, ideas and the environment; and world role, the movement of America from isolationism to worldwide responsibility.

At grade 4, students who scored at or above the Basic level (73 percent) were likely to be able to interpret a map about the Colonial economy; students scoring at or above Proficient (20 percent) were likely to be able to understand that canals increased trade among states; students scoring at Advanced (2 percent) were likely to be able to explain how machines and factories changed work.

At grade 8, the 69 percent of students scoring at or above Basic were likely to be able to identify a result of Native American-European interaction; the 17 percent at or above Proficient were likely to be able to identify a domestic impact of war; the 1 percent at Advanced were likely to be able to explain two differences between plantations and small farms in the antebellum South.

At grade 12, the 45 percent of students scoring at or above Basic were likely to be able to understand the context of a women’s movement document. The 12 percent who scored at or above Proficient were likely to be able to understand Missouri statehood in the context of sectionalism; and the 1 percent who scored at Advanced were likely to be able to evaluate Civil War arguments.

The Nation’s Report Card: U.S. History 2010, Grades 4, 8, and 12 is available at www.nationsreportcard.gov. Additional information is available at www.nagb.org/history

Read more at National Assessent Governing Board →

Secretary Clinton Trying to Warm Hugo Chavez’ Heart with ‘Sports Diplomacy’

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the National Basketball Association (NBA) announced today that Greivis Vasquez, a player on the NBA’s Memphis Grizzlies, former NBA player Darvin Ham, and former Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) player Kayte Christensen will travel to Caracas, Venezuela on June 16 – 21 as part of a U.S. government exchange program that brings people together for greater understanding through sports.

Vasquez, a native of Caracas, Ham, and Christensen will conduct basketball clinics with youth from underserved areas and meet with Venezuelan sports officials. In addition, the players will meet with Venezuelan students who are participating in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs’ English Access Microscholarship Program (Access). This program provides a foundation of English language skills to underserved youth, ages 14 – 18 years old.

Sports diplomacy builds on Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s vision of “smart power diplomacy.” It embraces the use of a full range of diplomatic tools, including sports, to bring individuals together in order to foster a greater understanding.

Sports Envoys are current and retired professional athletes and coaches that travel overseas to conduct drills and team building activities, as well as engage youth in a dialogue on the importance of education, positive health practices and respect for diversity. A partnership between the NBA and the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs’ SportsUnited Office, 42 NBA and WNBA players and coaches have visited 19 different countries since 2004, where they have conducted basketball clinics for thousands of young boys, girls and coaches.

Previous sports envoy program diplomats include: Willie Green of the New Orleans Hornets; Miami Heat Head Coach Erik Spoelstra; former NBA player and Olympic gold medalist Sam Perkins; NBA Hall of Famer George “The Iceman” Gervin, and WNBA basketball greats Cynthia Cooper and Sue Wicks.

The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs’ SportsUnited Office leads the U.S. Department of State’s international exchange efforts to bring the global community together through sports. Athletes and coaches from a range of sports are chosen to conduct clinics, visit schools, and engage with youth overseas in a dialogue on the importance of an education, positive health practices, and respect for diversity.

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Read more by HS News Staff →

Text Messaging Program to Help Latino Immigrants Save Money

Text Messaging Program to Help Latino Immigrants Save Money

Photo: Text Messaging Program to Help Latino Immigrants Save Money

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A new text messaging service to help monitor your monthly expenses has been released and is being marketed to Latino immigrants looking to save money.

Juntos Finanzas, is a text message based system that tracks spending practices, by having the consumer send a text like “GASOLINA 30.34” to Juntos which indicates they spent $30.34 of gas. At the end of the month, Juntos sends the consumer either an e-mail or paper chart showing where their money went.

“We’re not really doing anything that they couldn’t be doing on their own,” Juntos founder, Ben Knelman told Fast Company. “But when we give the information back, it’s coming from a third party. It looks professional. That information feels more real. It makes you think, ‘This is something I need to be thinking about.’”

Knelman said that during the six-month test, participants who earn less than $40,000 a year, were able to save about $1,400. A number of the participants were actually janitors at Stanford University, where graduate students including Knelman developed Juntos as part of a class.

Read more at Fast Company →

ERIC ROBERTS: “I Will Play Sebastián Piñera to the Bone”

ERIC ROBERTS: “I Will Play Sebastián Piñera to the Bone”

Photo: Eric Roberts as Sebastián Piñera

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The prolific actor will walk a mile in the Chilean President’s shoes for the upcoming miner film “Miracle Underground”. 

“I am very proud of playing Chile’s President,” said Roberts to Chile’s “La Segunda.” “He never lost hope. When everyone was thinking about giving up, he said ‘no, we can’t leave them there.’ So I have to play the hero. I love the idea.”

Roberts, who is currently in Berlin shooting Hungarian born filmmaker Zsolt Bács’ “The Child,” admitted that before the miners, he knew nothing about Chile.  “But I intend to investigate everything about the president. Let me tell you, I will play Sebastián Piñera to the bone! I’ll find everything I can about this man,” Roberts said.

Roberts told “La segunda he is looking forward visiting Chile following pre-production for the film, as Chile, is one of the few nations he has not yet visited.

“I believe in a superior being; but I got involved with this project mainly because I was impressed by the rescue. I followed every second of it—know anyone who didn’t? All of the US was glued to the TV. I t was really impressive,” said Roberts. 

Read more by HS News Staff →

Human Rights Experts, UN and Governments Meeting with Aim to Eradicate Torture in Latin America

Human Rights Experts, UN and Governments Meeting with Aim to Eradicate Torture in Latin America

Photo: Torture in Latin America

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Human rights experts and government officials from 11 countries today began a United Nations-backed meeting aimed at eradicating torture from Latin America and the Caribbean, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) reported.

United Nations Special Rapporteur on torture Juan Méndez said the meeting of more than 40 experts – which is taking place in Santiago, Chile – is the first in a series of such regional conferences that he expects to convene. Attending the meeting are representatives from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Jamaica, México, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.

“Torture and ill-treatment is a major concern in Latin America and the Caribbean region,” said Mr. Méndez, “and much remains to be done to ensure that States’ international obligations, national policies and legislative as well as other reforms are effectively implemented to achieve the desired result: torture’s eradication.”

“Over the past decade, some promising policies, reforms and legislation have been promulgated in the region,” he said. “However, these institutional developments and good national practices are vital and need to be further enhanced, strengthened and replicated across the region.”

“I am hopeful that this consultation will provide a much needed push in our efforts to eradicate torture and ill-treatment in the region.”

Mr. Méndez serves in an independent and unpaid capacity and reports to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

 

Read more by HS News Staff →

Tony Plana Leaves Rob Schneider’s Pilot, Cheech Marin is In!

Tony Plana Leaves Rob Schneider’s Pilot, Cheech Marin is In!

Photo: Cheech Marin and Rob Schneider

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The still unnamed project is also looking for new talent to replace leading ladies Ada Maris, and Nadine Velázquez.

CBS liked the idea for the show and has ordered more episodes, and a few tweaks. Enter Cheech Marin, who will play Fernando (originally to be played by Ugly Betty star Tony Plana), father-in-law to the solitary Rob (played by Schneider).

The series, which is said to air as a mid-season substitute, is based on Shneider’s real life antics of an American man who marries into a large Mexican family.

 

Read more by HS News Staff →

Report States Many Guns Being Used in Mexico Drug War Came From U.S.

Report States Many Guns Being Used in Mexico Drug War Came From U.S.

Photo: Report: 70 percent of firearms seized by authorities in Mexico in 2009 and 2010, came from the U.S.

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According to data from the U.S. government, about 70 percent of firearms seized by authorities in Mexico in 2009 and 2010, came from the U.S.

The data was released in a report on Monday, and now three Democratic U.S. senators are calling for tougher firearms laws and regulations, as they believe stricter rules are necessary to relieve Mexico’s drug gangs of their weapons. These firearms have aided in the slaughter of more than 34,000 Mexicans since 2006.

“Congress has been virtually moribund while powerful Mexican drug trafficking organizations continue to gain unfettered access to military-style firearms coming from the United States,” said California Democrat, Sen. Dianne Feinstein.

ImageSen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) agreed with Feinstein saying, “This report confirms what many of us already know to be true. ... It is still too easy for Mexican drug lords to get their hands on deadly military-grade weapons within our borders. We need to redouble our efforts to keep violent firearms out of the hands of these traffickers.”

In 2004, an assault weapons ban expired, and the Feinstein, along with Schumer and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) want the ban reinstated and want a provision that would not allow private sellers at gun shows to sell weapons without first doing background checks.

As the three officials fight for the ban once again be in place, Mexican officials see the U.S.’s lax gun laws as part of their country’s problem.

In 2010, Mexican President Felipe Calderon told the U.S. Congress, “If you don’t regulate the sale of arms in the right way, nothing guarantees that the criminals won’t have access to these. There are more than 7,000 gun stores along the border with Mexico where anyone can buy. I ask Congress to help us and understand how important it is to have strong laws to avoid arming the criminals.”

The report states that of the 29,284 firearms recovered in 2009 and 2010 by Mexican authorities and sent to the U.S. Department of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives for tracing, 15,131 were manufactured in the U.S., 5,373 were imported to U.S. from another country, and 8,780 are of unknown origin.

Read more at The Wall Street Journal →

MEET “Los Enanitos Toreros” Mexico’s Smallest Bullfighters! (VIDEO)

MEET “Los Enanitos Toreros” Mexico’s Smallest Bullfighters! (VIDEO)

Photo: "Los Enanitos Toreros"

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“Los Enanitos Toreros” are a group of six comedians from Yucatan who travel across Mexico entertaining audiences with their daring, skillful and hilarious bullfighting performances. Unlike traditional bullfights, the animals are not harmed, and the show is about skill and slapstick.
Imagehttp://www.hispanicallyspeakingnews.com/uploads/images/article-images/Screen_shot_2011-06-15_at_10.44_.59_AM_.png

Read more by HS News Staff →

Latino Commission on AIDS Launches Local, Regional & National Educational Program

The Latino Commission on AIDS is proud to announce that it is launching Tratamiento Ahora/Treatment Now - a local, regional and national treatment education and skills building program.

The fourfold goals of the program are: to provide Spanish language treatment and adherence education skills; develop knowledge of critical new HIV/AIDS treatment information in Spanish; create advocacy treatment initiatives; and to share strategies among treatment educators. The program will pioneer disease integration and navigation to access health care.

The five key areas of Tratamiento Ahora/Treatment Now program are:

The Latino Treatment Skills Building Training – The Treatment Training will be delivered in cities across the United States & Territories. The focus will be to enhance treatment educator’s capacity to effectively communicate treatment information to Spanish-speaking service providers, persons living with HIV/AIDS & their care givers.

The National Latino Treatment Educator’s Network– The Network will coordinate Spanish speaking treatment educators from across the nation so they can share information, & successful treatment education models among other health topics.

Treatment Updates & Information Dissemination – Information is power, and timely treatment information is critical to making smart decisions on health & treatment options.

Latino Treatment Educator’s Summit – The Summit will bring together treatment educators from around the country and will serve as an opportunity for educators to stay informed about each other’s work, as well as to continue sharing the latest information in between Treatment Summits.

Establishing the National Latino Treatment Advocacy Network – The advocacy network will focus on mobilizing our communities at all levels to ensure access to treatment and health care for our most impacted communities.

“Today we reaffirm our commitment to escalating our treatment education initiatives and community mobilization in order to empower patients and to achieve healthy communities by ensuring access to quality health care for our communities” stated Guillermo Chacón, President of the Latino Commission on AIDS.

Read more by HS News Staff →

EXTREME TRAFFICKING:  16-Yr Old Texan Boy Captured Driving Truck into U.S. with 126 Pounds of Pot

EXTREME TRAFFICKING:  16-Yr Old Texan Boy Captured Driving Truck into U.S. with 126 Pounds of Pot

Photo: Fuel Tank of 16-Yr Old Drug Smuggler

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers working at the El Paso port of entry seized 126 pounds of marijuana Sunday afternoon. The drugs were hidden in a van being driven by a 16-year-old El Paso boy.

The seizure was made just before 3 p.m. when the juvenile drove a 1999 Chevrolet Astro van from Mexico to the U.S. at the Ysleta international crossing. A CBP officer at the primary inspection booth initiated an exam and then selected the vehicle for a secondary inspection. CBP drug sniffing dog “Dax” alerted to the vehicle during the exam. CBP officers continued their inspection and located a non-factory compartment concealed in the gas tank to the van. Two large bales of marijuana were removed from the fuel tank. The drugs weighed 126 pounds. The driver of the van was turned over to the El Paso Police Department for prosecution.

“Unfortunately some teens become involved in drug smuggling without realizing that the consequences of their actions can have a negative impact on their lives for many years to come,” said Norman Bebon, CBP El Paso assistant port director. “CBP officers at our area border crossings are vigilant and thorough and smugglers of any age, sex, race or ethnic group should understand that we are working hard everyday to identify and stop violators at the border.”

While anti-terrorism is the primary mission of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the inspection process at the ports of entry associated with this mission results in impressive numbers of enforcement actions in all categories.

Read more by HS News Staff →

Convicted Criminals to Replace Undocumented Workers in Georgia

Convicted Criminals to Replace Undocumented Workers in Georgia

Photo: Farm Workers

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A large number of immigrants are fleeing Georgia as anti-immigrant legislation is set to be enacted. Gov. Nathan Deal has issued a statement that he is looking to fill vacant farm jobs with convicted criminals. The governor has called on the state’s commissioners of labor, corrections and agriculture to work together to connect unemployed probationers with a state agriculture industry now desperate for workers.

“I believe this would be a great partial solution to our current status as we continue to move towards sustainable results with the legal options available,” Deal said in his statement.

Georgia’s agriculture commissioner, Gary Black, released a survey this week that found state farm owners have 11,080 jobs they now need to fill.

The vast majority of those jobs pay $15 per hour or less and last between one and six months, Black’s survey found.

“This points to complete the out-of-touch perspective that some of our legislators and our leadership in this state have with regard to the current immigration crisis we are facing,” said Jerry Gonzalez, the executive director of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials.

“The governor is really shortchanging on solutions for our number one industry.”

Read more at Politico →

Five Illegal Aliens with Criminal Histories Apprehended at Arizona-Mexico Border

Five Illegal Aliens with Criminal Histories Apprehended at Arizona-Mexico Border

Photo: Criminal Aliens Apprehended

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Over the weekend, Tucson Sector Border Patrol agents arrested five illegal aliens with dangerous criminal histories. Three of the illegal aliens are members of violent street gangs and two had felony convictions for manslaughter.

On Friday, Casa Grande Station agents patrolling near Sells, Ariz., apprehended an illegal alien from Mexico who was identified as a member of the Mara Salvatrucha 13 street gang. Later that evening, agents from the Ajo Station apprehended an illegal alien from Mexico northeast of Lukeville, Ariz., who admitted to being a member of the Sureño street gang. On Saturday, Naco Station agents apprehended an illegal alien from Mexico who admitted to being affiliated with the 18th Street gang. All three subjects are being criminally prosecuted for illegal entry.

On Friday, an illegal alien from Tamaulipas, Mexico, was apprehended near Amado, Ariz., by Nogales Station agents. Record checks revealed the suspect had a prior conviction in Queens, New York, for first degree manslaughter with intent to cause serious physical injury. On Saturday, Ajo Station agents patrolling northeast of Lukeville, Ariz., apprehended a Mexican national with an extensive criminal history including convictions in California for voluntary manslaughter, robbery, burglary and assault with a deadly weapon. Both subjects are being prosecuted for re-entry of an aggravated felon.

Read more by HS News Staff →



WednesdayJune 15, 2011