1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to secondary content



Hispanic Health News

Hispanic Americans Less Likely to Recognize Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

Hispanic Americans Less Likely to Recognize Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

Photo: Hispanic Stroke Patients

Click Here to Enlarge Photo

While stroke, heart disease and other cerebrovascular diseases are the fourth leading cause of death in Hispanics – stroke and heart disease account for one in four deaths among Hispanic men and one in three deaths among Hispanic women - findings suggest that a stroke knowledge deficit is more pronounced among this population.

In recognition of Stroke Awareness Month, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) is working to increase awareness of the signs and symptoms of stroke and the urgency of seeking medical attention among the Hispanic community.

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries blood and oxygen to the brain is blocked by plaque or a blood clot (acute ischemic stroke), or breaks (hemorrhagic stroke), destroying up to 1.9 million brain cells per minute. Approximately 795,000 strokes occur each year.

According to the Office of Minority Health, Hispanics between the ages of 35 and 64 are more likely to suffer a stroke than non-Hispanic whites. In a survey of 2,000 women about stroke, Hispanics were less aware of the signs and symptoms of stroke than Caucasians.

Furthermore, in a separate study of 25,426 individuals, non-English speaking Hispanic Americans, compared to those who speak English, were also less likely to identify the signs and symptoms of stroke or recognize the need for immediate medical attention.