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Can Latinos Change Utah From Red to Blue?

It’s known as the reddest of the red states. And a recent article in the Ogden Standard-Examiner reiterated the fact: In a state considered among the reddest in the United States, the increasing number of Hispanic voters in Utah could eventually begin to soften some of that red influence. continue reading »

The Dilemma of Higher Education Facing Latinos

One of the questions Latinos face in our time is the pursuit of higher education. The only reason this is an issue is due to the high cost of obtaining a degree and the prospects of finding employment with it. The high unemployment and underemployment scale has many re-evaluating conventional wisdom. continue reading »

Immigration and the Lame Duck Congress

What a difference an election makes. Take, for instance, immigration. Wasn’t it a mere handful of weeks ago that Republicans were staunchly stalwart in their opposition to any and all immigration reform? Now there’s talk of a GOP led immigration bill to be considered by the lame duck Congress. continue reading »

Bill O’Reilly is Right, I Do Want Things

It’s not often that I agree with Bill O’Reilly, and I’ve definitely never been moved to write about it. But on the eve of the election, as votes were being counted, O’Reilly, the FOX News personality, was on FOX giving his opinion on why it appeared that President Obama was poised to win. continue reading »

A Tale of Two Communities and Contaminated Water

This past week two stories stood out identifying two communities of color different in many ways but connected by a common challenge: contaminated water. continue reading »

Latino Money: The Missed Political Story of 2012

Here’s something interesting that bubbled up in the wake of last week’s election: 4% of all itemized political contributions this year came from mostly Latino neighborhoods. continue reading »

Latinos Aren’t a Sleeping Giant. Latinos are Awake, Standing and Listening.

There’s a difference between waking up and standing up. And there comes a point where old, tired analogies should be scuttled. Latino politics are at that point; the recent national election emphasized it with several ending exclamation marks. continue reading »

5 Things the Next President Should Learn About Latinos

Regardless of who wins the Presidential race next Tuesday, there is one undeniable factor in the mix this election: the rise of the importance of the Latino electorate. continue reading »

Sandy Reconstruction: Latinos to the Rescue

I’m floored, flabbergasted. Read this: Immigrant workers, mostly Hispanics in the building trades, will flock along with others to the areas devastated by Hurricane Sandy. As in previous natural disasters, they will be an important component of any rebuilding. continue reading »

Sincere Belief in Economic Relief with Sebastian and Iago

Independence was a running theme in my household when I was younger. There was no such as privacy when I was growing up. Telephone calls were measured because they somehow affected the electric bill. At that point, we lived in a two bedroom house. My uncle slept in one room and my parents and sister slept in the other room. I felt the need for independence, so I slept in the living room on a mattress I brought out every night from underneath my parents’ bed. I did not mind except that my dad would wake me up to show me how early he had to be up. continue reading »

Presidential Race: It’s All About the Latino Ground Game

I mentioned in polite company a couple of times that Latinos are a fourth quarter political people. And even in polite company the idea hasn’t been that well received. But I insist, now that we’re in the fourth quarter of this presidential campaign, it’s our, Latino, time. continue reading »

Lard, Cheese and the Rewards of an Unhealthy Childhood

I was a fat kid. I mean, fat. I was so fat; I would start to sweat if I stood still long enough. I would like to blame it on the scourge of places like Burger King or Kentucky Fried Chicken, but my parents rarely relied on fast food as a means for a nutritional strategy. In fact, I was almost a teenager when I first went to Burger King. However, my mom fried everything in lard. Her arms were scarred from burns she had suffered battling breakfast. My mother used lard like some people use cinnamon. I suspect that she would put tapioca pudding on lard and simply called it flan. continue reading »

Saving the World, One Broken Stick at a Time

I am the last person in the world you would expect to save the world. As a kid, I would go to the backyard and light Styrofoam on fire and dance around it, like a pagan, so it was a bit of a shock when I joined the Ecology Club in high school. At first I joined it because it provided shelter inside the main building away from rainy days. However, I realized that the girls heavily outnumbered the boys, and this was the only forum where girls would actually care for what I had to say. continue reading »

Earning a Spot in the Devil’s Backyard

I never figured that my father was quite the revolutionary or an agent for social change. He just did what he did, and would later state the morality at stake, as if it should have been obvious. I knew that he was a democrat with the exception of the 1980’s when the Reagan Revolution allowed him to fix the legal paperwork that gave him and my mother amnesty. continue reading »